The Abolition of Britain: From Winston Churchill to Princess Diana

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Encounter Books, 2000 - History - 332 pages
2 Reviews
Prominent English social critic Peter Hitchens writes of the period between the death of Winston Churchill and the funeral of Princess Diana, a time he believes has seen disasterous changes in English life. The Abolition of Britain is bitingly witty and fiercely argued, yet also filled with somber appreciation for what the idea of England has always meant to the West and to the world.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lightparade - LibraryThing

Hitchens - madman or seer? Always vulnerable to an attack of DailyMailism, there are nevertheless plenty of valid points made in this attack on our muddled society. The first chapter, which looks back to London at the time of Churchill's funeral in 1965, is particularly effective. Read full review

The Abolition of Britain by Peter Hitchens

User Review  - richtx - Overstock.com

An unnerving look into what happens when a country trades timetested values and notions for the latest thing. Aside from the continuing patriotism in America and its Christian leanings you have to wonder if it could ever happen here too. Read full review

Contents

A Modern Man
1
one The Warrior and the Victim
17
two Born Yesterday
44
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Peter Hitchens was the London Daily Express correspondent in Washington.

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