The Monarchy and the Constitution

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Oxford University Press, 1997 - Political Science - 328 pages
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In the increasingly questioning world of the 1990s, the role of the monarchy in a democracy is again coming under scrutiny. Its critics argue that the monarchy is a profoundly conservative institution which serves to inhibit social change; that it has outlived its usefulness; that it symbolizes and reinforces deference and hierarchy; and that its radical reform is therefore long overdue.

Rejecting these arguments, Vernon Bogdanor makes a powerful case for the positive role that monarchy plays in modern democratic politics. Ranging across law, politics, and history he argues that far from undermining democracy, the monarchy sustains and strengthens democratic institutions; that constitutional monarchy is a form of government that ensures not conservatism but legitimacy.

The first serious examination of the political role of the monarchy to appear in many years, this book will make fascinating reading for all those interested in the monarchy and the future of British politics.
 

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Contents

The Evolution of Constitutional Monarchy
1
The Rules of Succession
42
Influence and the Prerogative
61
The Appointment of a Prime Minister
84
Three Constitutional Crises
113
Hung Parliaments and Proportional Representation
145
The Financing of the Monarchy
183
The Sovereigns Private Secretary
197
The Future of Constitutional Monarchy
298
Sovereigns since Henry VIII
310
British prime ministers since 1782
311
Private secretaries since 1870
313
Member states of the Commonwealth 1995
314
Some constitutional episodes involving the use of royal power since 1900
316
Select Bibliography
318
Index
323

The Sovereign and the Church
215
The Sovereign and the Commonwealth
240

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About the author (1997)


A regular contributor to the national press and television, Vernon Bogdanor is Reader in Government, and Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford.

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