Travels Into the Interior Parts of Africa, Volume 2

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G. G. and J. Robinson, 1796 - South Africa
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I have compared this translation of Vol II by CG & C Robinson with sections from the (original) French and the Dutch version.The selected sections compared well. I also used the composite Cape Town version of 1973. The latter provided selected subjects and a very condensed version of the three Robinson volumes.
Some of the references were checked and agreed.
The various versions of Le Vaillant are available (non-digitized!) at the Africana (Merensky) section of the library of the University of Pretoria.
This Google digitized version offered convenience and ease of use and I would appreciate digitization of Volume III which would complete the seies.
 

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Page 187 - ... not be hurt, a small part of its thickness, and this amputation, often renewed and with much patience, makes the horn bend in a contrary direction, and, the point meeting the root, it exhibits the appearance of a perfect circle. As it is certain that incision always causes a greater or less degree of bending, it may be readily conceived that every variation that caprice can imagine may be produced by this simple method. In...
Page 398 - I may establish as a certain rule that the males are generally 15 or 16 feet in height, and the females from 13 to 14 feet. Whoever should judge of the thickness of these animals from the above dimensions would be greatly deceived. The eye indeed that is accustomed to the long, full figures of Europe, finds no proportion between a height of 16 feet and a length of seven, taken from the tail to the breast. Another deformity, if it may be called so, makes us contrast the parts before with those behind....
Page 187 - If they wish to have six, or even more, similar notches made with the saw produce as many as may be required, but if they are desirous of forcing one of these divisions in the whole horn to form, for example, a complete circle, they cut away from the point, which...
Page 398 - I killed it, 16 feet 4 inches, from the hoof to the extremity of its horns. I use this expression in order to be understood ; for the giraffe has no real horns, but between its ears, at the upper extremity of the head, arise, in a perpendicular and parallel direction, two excrescences from the cranium, which without any joint stretch to the height of eight or nine inches, terminating in a convex knob, and are surrounded by a row of strong straight hair, which overtops them by several lines. The female...
Page 403 - It is indeed a peaceful and timid animal ; it shuns danger, and flies from it, trotting along very fast : a good horse can with difficulty overtake it. It is said that it has not strength to defend itself; but I know, beyond a doubt, that by its kicking it often tires out, discourages, and even beats off the lion. Except upon one occasion I never saw it make use of its horns : they may be considered of no utility, were it possible to doubt the wisdom and precautions employed by nature, whose motives...
Page 185 - I was nrnch surprised when I first beheld one of these animals. I scarcely knew them to be oxen and cows, not only on account of their being much smaller than ours, since I observed in them the same form and the same fundamental character, in which I could not be deceived, but on account of the multiplicity...
Page 118 - Chinefe : and to the fight and touch his hair has the refemblance of wool ; it is very fhort, curls naturally, and in colour is as black as ebony, He has very little hair, yet he employs no fmall care. to pull out by the roots part of what he has ; but the natural thinnefs of his eyebrows...
Page 403 - They often lie down to ruminate or to sleep, which causes a considerable callosity on the sternum, and makes their knees to be covered with a hard skin. ' Had nature,' says our author in conclusion, ' endowed the giraffe with an irascible disposition, it certainly would have had cause to complain ; for the means with which it is provided either for attack or defence are very trifling. It is indeed a peaceful and timid animal ; it shuns danger, and flies from it, trotting along very fast : a good...
Page 191 - Having despatched one of my people to our camp with orders to bring the bottoms of two boxes, a piece of a summer kaross, a hoop, a few small nails, a hammer, a saw, and other small tools that I might have occasion for, as soon as he returned I formed in great haste, and in a very rude manner, a pair of bellows, which were not more powerful than those generally used in our kitchens.
Page 104 - ... intestines, fixed to one of its extremities, is retained at the other by a knot in the barrel of a quill which is flattened and cleft. This quill being opened, forms a very long isosceles triangle, about two inches in length ; and at the base of this triangle the hole is made that keeps the string fast, the end of which, drawn back, is tied at the other end of the bow with a very thin thong of leather. This cord may be stretched so as to have a greater or less degree of tension according to the...

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