Power of Internal Martial Arts: Combat Secrets of Ba Gua, Tai Chi, and Hsing-I

Front Cover
North Atlantic Books, Dec 31, 1997 - Sports & Recreation - 344 pages
This book's primary focus is on the detailed descriptions of the three main internal boxing methods (Hsing I, Ba Gua, and Tai Chi), as well as many substyles. In-depth comparisons and analyses of the different arts in regard to their methods of movement, principles and philosophies, use of force and energy, body mechanics, and some practical applications, are also described. Frantzis also includes "Personal Odyssey" sections where he recounts many of his interesting encounters with famous martial arts masters. This feature recalls Robert W. Smith's Chinese Boxing: Masters and Methods, from a previous generation of martial arts books. To make this book as accessible to beginners as possible, there are five appendices covering the different styles of tai chi (such as Yang, Chen, Wu, Tung, Hou, and Sun), a history of Ba Gua, energy anatomy of the human body, a summary of Mr. Frantzis's training and lineage, a chapter on Chinese terminology and transliteration, and an extensive glossary.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A PERSONAL ODYSSEY
1
ANIMAL HUMAN AND SPIRITUAL
5
THROUGH THE MARTIAL ARTS
8
What Is the Art of Internal Martial Arts?
11
A CONTINUUM
21
The Ingenuity of Form Movements Containing Fighting
28
A PERSONAL ODYSSEY
33
Eight Drunken
46
The Techniques and Training Proctices of Hsingl
185
The Animal Forms
196
PROFILE OF AN INTERNAL MASTER
203
Bo Guo Chong os o Mortiol Art
207
PROFILE of AN INTERNALMASTER Boi HuoClarity and Precision
214
The Energies of the I ChingThe Beginning
220
Changing Energies and Fighting Applications
227
Monkey Boxing 199
229

PROFILE OF AN INTERNAL MASTER
59
The Relationship of Chi Gung to Martial Arts
65
Dissolving into Inner and Outer Space Simultaneously
71
Toi Chi Hsingl and Bo GuoWhofs the Some
76
Efficiency and RiskReward Ratio 83 Emotions
82
and II
88
Simultaneous Projection of Energy in Opposite Directions
98
Wing Chun
104
PROFILE OF AN INTERNAL MASTER
118
The Four Styles of Push Hands
156
Different Kinds of Toi Chi Mosters or Teochers Thot
163
HSINGI
170
Fighting Considerotions ond Applicotions 207
171
Three Moin Schools of Hsingl
178
Circles and Spirals
234
PROFILE OF AN INTERNAL MASTER
241
SPEED
249
Leg and Foot Speed
252
The FostSlow Porodox of the Internol Mortiol Arts
260
PROFILES OF INTERNAL MASTERS
267
Do You Have to Learn SelfDefense to Get the Health Benefits?
273
How the Internal Mortiol Arts and Chi Gung
280
The Volue of Leorning Internal Styles for Older Mortiol Artists 286 through the MARTALARIs
288
PROFILE OF AN INTERNAL MASTER
293
Yang Style Plus the Chen Small Style Begets the HaoWu Style
300
Causes of Variation within the Same Style
306
Ba Gua in Hong Kong
312
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

B.K. Frantzis began martial arts in 1961. After advanced blackbelt training in judo, karate, and aikido in Japan, he went deeper into martial arts and healing techniques full-time for ten years in China. He teaches in North American and Europe.

Bibliographic information