Antiquities of the Southern Indians particularity of the Georgia Tribes

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Appleton & C, 1873 - 532 pages
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Page 414 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty, That had their haunts in dale or piny mountain, Or forest, by slow stream or pebbly spring, Or chasms, and watery depths ; all these have vanished ; They live no longer in the faith of reason...
Page 274 - The Lake Dwellings of Switzerland and other Parts of Europe. By Dr. F. KELLER, President of the Antiquarian Association of Zurich. Translated and arranged by JE LEE, FSAFGS Author of 'Isca Silurum.
Page 416 - Ceterum nec cohibere parietibus deos, neque in ullam humani oris speciem assimulare, ex magnitudine coelestium arbitrantur : lucos ac nemora consecrant, deorumque nominibus appellant secretum illud, quod sola reverentia vident.
Page 69 - I will be master of what is mine own : She is my goods, my chattels ; she is my house, My household stuff, my field, my barn, My horse, my ox, my ass, my any thing...
Page 117 - And scattered in the furrows lie The weapons of his rest, And there, in the loose sand, is thrown Of his large arm the mouldering bone.
Page 414 - They live no longer in the faith of reason ! But still the heart doth need a language, still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names, And to yon starry world they now are gone, Spirits or gods, that used to share this earth With man as with their friend...
Page 207 - Our lives are rivers, gliding free To that unfathomed, boundless sea, The silent grave ! Thither all earthly pomp and boast Roll, to be swallowed up and lost In one dark wave. Thither the mighty torrents stray, Thither the brook pursues its way, And tinkling rill. There all are equal. Side by side The poor man and the son of pride Lie calm and still.
Page 261 - The master-workman, seated on the ground, lays one of these flakes on the palm of his left hand, holding it firmly down with two or more fingers of the same hand, and with his right hand, between the thumb and two forefingers, places his chisel (or punch) on the point that is to be broken off; and a cooperator (a striker) sitting in front of him, with a mallet of very hard wood, strikes the chisel (or punch) on the upper end, flaking the flint off on the under side, below each projecting point that...
Page 342 - ... kept with the strictest religious care from one generation to another, and are exempted from being buried with the dead. They belong to the town where they are used, and are carefully preserved.
Page 307 - But previous to their carrying off their crops from the field, there is a large crib or granary, erected in the plantation, which is called the King's crib; and to this each family carries and deposits a certain quantity, according to his ability or inclination, or none at all if he so chooses...

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