Thucydides: Books II and III

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American Book Company, 1905 - Greece - 440 pages
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Page 185 - The great object of the fastsailing Athenian trireme was, to drive its beak against some weak part of the adversary's ship ; the stern, the side, or the oars, — not against the beak, which was strongly constructed as well for defence as for offence. The Athenian, therefore, rowing through the intervals of the adversary's line, and thus getting in their rear, turned rapidly, and got the opportunity, before the ship of the adversary could change its position, of striking it cither in the stern or...
Page 72 - Thus for a long time the ancient Athenians enjoyed a country life in self-governing communities; and although they were now united in a single city, they and their descendants, down to the time of this war, from old habit generally resided with their households in the country where they had been born. For this reason, and also because they had recently restored their country-houses and estates after the Persian War, they had a disinclination to move. They were depressed at the thought of forsaking...
Page 20 - ... in one utterances that were scattered over many. This enables him to mass relevant material at significant points. The actual words are but a text from which the historian will extract the controlling and characteristic ideas of the speaker's political creed and life. The thoughts are the speaker's, but they have been caught up into the mind of the historian, generalized, idealized, and sent forth again with his stamp upon them — ttie stamp of a larger meaning and a wider application.
Page 115 - KTÍ. : but in action, when the task was visibly before them, it was in themselves they proudly put their trust.
Page 20 - The thoughts that were expressed, and the words that conveyed them, have been sought out, where possible ; but they have been caught up into the mind of the historian, generalized, idealized, and sent forth with his stamp upon them — the stamp of a larger meaning and a wider application.

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