Men Without Women: Stories

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, May 9, 2017 - Fiction - 240 pages
NATIONAL BESTSELLER • “Examines what happens to characters without important women in their lives; it'll move you and confuse you and sometimes leave you with more questions than answers.” —Barack Obama

Includes the story "Drive My Car,” now a major motion picture


Across seven tales, Haruki Murakami brings his powers of observation to bear on the lives of men who, in their own ways, find themselves alone. Here are lovesick doctors, students, ex-boyfriends, actors, bartenders, and even Kafka’s Gregor Samsa, brought together to tell stories that speak to us all. In Men Without Women Murakami has crafted another contemporary classic, marked by the same wry humor and pathos that have defined his entire body of work.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Ken-Me-Old-Mate - LibraryThing

Towards the end of the first story I had that inkling that the story would not resolve and we would be left hanging in that annoying post-modern way. And the second story too. After that I gave up ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - modioperandi - LibraryThing

A collection of paired down stories from the master of Weird Loneliness. After having read Men w/o Women and then read Killing Commendatore this collection feels like a series of sketches that lead to ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Drive My
Yesterday
An Independent Organ
Scheherazade
Kino
Samsa in Love
Men Without Women
A Note About the Author
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Haruki Murakami was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives near Tokyo. His work has been translated into more than fifty languages, and the most recent of his many international honors is the Hans Christian Andersen Literature Award, whose previous recipients include J. K. Rowling, Isabel Allende, and Salman Rushdie.
www.harukimurakami.com

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