ABC of Reading, Volume 0

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 1960 - Education - 206 pages
54 Reviews
This important work, first published in 1934, is a concise statement of Pound’s aesthetic theory. It is a primer for the reader who wants to maintain an active, critical mind and become increasingly sensitive to the beauty and inspiration of the world’s best literature. With characteristic vigor and iconoclasm, Pound illustrates his precepts with exhibits meticulously chosen from the classics, and the concluding “Treatise on Meter” provides an illuminating essay for anyone aspiring to read and write poetry. ABC of Reading displays Pound’s great ability to open new avenues in literature for our time.
 

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Review: ABC of Reading

User Review  - Frankie - Goodreads

Despite the pretentious name, this is not really a reading guide per se, more of a poetry appreciation guide. Especially for the first few chapters, where he preaches what he considers to be the canon ... Read full review

Review: ABC of Reading

User Review  - D. Thompson - Goodreads

I didn't get this until I was in graduate school and this could be because I didn't get much of the poetic function during my undergraduate years. Still, this book has some very good information. Read full review

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Contents

1
17
CHAPTER TWO
28
CHAPTER FOUR
36
CHAPTER FIVE
50
CHAPTER SIX
58
DISSOCIATE
88
Exhibits page
95
DICHTEN CONDENSARE
97
Four Periods
132
Style of a Period
145
A Table of Dates
173
To Recapitulate
187
INDEX
207
Copyright

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About the author (1960)

New Directions has been the primary publisher of Ezra Pound in the U.S. since the founding of the press when James Laughlin published New Directions in Prose and Poetry 1936. That year Pound was fifty-one. In Laughlin’s first letter to Pound, he wrote: “Expect, please, no fireworks. I am bourgeois-born (Pittsburgh); have never missed a meal. . . . But full of ‘noble caring’ for something as inconceivable as the future of decent letters in the US.” Little did Pound know that into the twenty-first century the fireworks would keep exploding as readers continue to find his books relevant and meaningful.