Sisterhood is Global: The International Women's Movement Anthology

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Feminist Press at CUNY, 1984 - Literary Collections - 821 pages
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   Sisterhood Is Global has been revered as the essential feminist text on the international women's movement since its first appearance, when it was hailed as "a historic publishing event." The anthology features original essays Morgan commissioned from a deliberately eclectic mix of women both famous and less known-grass-roots activisits, politicians, scholars, querillas, novelists, social scientists, and journalists-representing 70 countries, from every region and political system, with particular emphasis on the Global South. These truth-telling, impassioned essays celebrate the diversity as well as the similarity of women's experience; they also reveal shared female rage, vision, and pragmatic strategies for worldwide feminist solidarity and political transformation.

   Each country's essay is preceded by a statistical preface containing carefully researched and referenced data on the status of women, including: population, birth rate, infant mortality, life expectancy, contraception and abortion (both laws and practices); percentage of women in education, government, and labor force; laws and practices regarding women's religious, secular, educational, and employment rights (including marriage, divorce, motherhood, custody, sexual preference, welfare, prostitution, rape, battery, sexual harrasment, and traditional/cultural practices); "herstory"; "mythography"; and more. Despite dramatic geopolitical changes since the book's first publication, much of the data on women remains virtually the same.

   The first such international collection,Sisterhood Is Global became an instant classic and remains unequalled in its breadth and comprehensiveness. The book covers Afghanistan to Zimbabwe (as well as the status of women in the United Nations itself), and includes moving essays from such distinguished writers as Marjorie Agosin (Chile), Ama Ata Aidoo (Ghana), Shulamit Aloni (Israel), Peggy Antrobus (Caribbean), Simone de Beauvoir (France), Lidia Falcon (Spain), Hema Goonatilake (Sri Lanka), Fatima Mernessi (Morocco), Nawal El Saadawi (Egypt), Ana Titkow (Poland), Marilyn Waring (New Zealand), and Xiao Lu (China).

 

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Contents

The Silent Victims
41
Preface
45
The DaytoDay Struggle
47
Preface
50
The Fire Cannot Be Extinguished
54
Preface
60
Women in a Warrior Society
63
Preface
69
The Harem Window
419
Preface
424
The Wave of Consciousness Cannot Be Reversed
429
Preface
436
Pioneers and Promoters of Women
441
Preface
444
The Merchants Daughter and the Son of the Sultan
447
Preface
454

Benevolent Despotism Versus the Contemporary Feminist Movement
72
Preface
77
A Fertile but Ambiguous Feminist Terrain
80
Preface
89
The Politics of Survival
94
Preface
100
The Empowerment of Women
104
Preface
111
Fighting Until the End
114
A Journey in the Making
118
HaitiA Vacation Paradise of Hell
126
We Women Arent Sheep
131
Preface
135
Women of Smoke
138
Preface
142
Feudal Attitudes Party Control and Half the Sky
151
Preface
157
Fighting for the Right to Fight
160
Preface
166
Paradise Gained Paradise LostThe Price of Integration
169
Preface
178
Letter from a Troubled Copenhagen Redstocking
181
Preface
187
NeededA Revolution in Attitude
190
Preface
194
When a Woman Rebels
199
Preface
207
We Cannot Wait
210
Preface
215
The Right to Be Oneself
218
Preface
224
FeminismAlive Well and in Constant Danger
229
Preface
236
Witch Vilmmas Invention of SpeechSwallowing A Parable
242
Preface
245
Fragmented Selves A Collage
248
Preface
255
To Be a Woman
258
Preface
266
A Village Sisterhood
272
Preface
278
Our Daily Bread
282
Preface
286
The Nonexistence of Womens Emancipation
289
Preface
294
A Condition Across Caste and Class
305
Preface
311
Multiple Roles and Double Burdens
318
Preface
324
A Future in the PastThe Prerevolutionary Womens Movement
330
Preface
339
Preface
343
Coping with the Womb and the Border
347
Preface
353
Up the Down Escalator
360
Preface
365
A Mortified Thirst for Living
370
Preface
376
The Sun and the Shadow
382
Preface
389
Not Just Literacy but Wisdom
394
Preface
399
A Grandmothers Vision
404
Preface
406
Gods Willand the Process of Socialization
410
Preface
414
Women as a Caste
460
Preface
465
In the Unions the Parties the Streets and the Bedrooms
469
Preface
476
Foreigners in Our Own Land
480
Preface
485
To My Companeras on the Planet Earth
490
Preface
494
Not Spinning on the Axis of Maleness
498
Preface
505
More Power to Women
509
Preface
515
All It Requires Is Ourselves
517
Preface
525
WomenA Fractured Profile
530
Preface
536
Women and the Revolution
540
Preface
546
Not Even with a Rose Petal
550
Preface
555
Lets Pull Down the Bastilles Before They Are Built
560
Preface
567
Daring to Be Different
571
Preface
576
The Right to Be Persecuted
580
Preface
582
An Emerging Social Force
587
Preface
589
Elegance Amid the Phallocracy
593
Preface
600
Going up the Mountain
611
A Bulletin from Within
618
Preface
621
Women Are the Conscience of Our Country
626
Preface
632
The Voice of Women
637
Preface
644
Womens Studiesand a New Village Stove
650
Preface
655
Similarity Singularity and Sisterhood
661
Preface
667
We Superwomen Must Allow the Men to Grow Up
671
Preface
676
Its Time We Began with Ourselves
683
Preface
690
Good Grief There Are Women Here
692
Preface
696
Honoring the Vision of Changing Woman
705
Preface
714
For As Long As It Takes
716
Preface
722
The Braided Army
728
Preface
731
Neofeminismand Its Six Mortal Sins
734
Zambia
739
Feminist ProgressMore Difficult Than Decolonization
742
Zimbabwe
746
It Can Only Be Handled by Women
752
CrossCultural RebellionA Sampling of Feminist Proverbs
756
Sister
758
Glossary
761
Bibliography
767
Acknowledgments
809
A Womans Creed
813
Index
815
Copyright

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Page xviii - 1977 or 1978" for "developed" countries and 1975-80 for "less developed" or "developing" countries; in the latter case, the source notes that the statistics are frequently rough estimates because of less complete registration of births and deaths. ' Our infant mortality data refer to the number of deaths of infants under one year of age and bear the dates 1977 for developed countries and 1975-80 for less developed...
Page 1 - While women represent half the global population and one-third of the [paid] labor force, they receive only one-tenth of the world income and own less than 1 percent of the world property.

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About the author (1984)

Robin Morgan lives in New York. She is the author of, most recently, "A Hot January: Poems 1996-1999.

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