Student Companion to Herman Melville

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007 - Literary Criticism - 192 pages
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Student Companion to Herman Melville provides a critical introduction to the life and literary works of Herman Melville, the nineteenth-century American author of Moby-Dick, as well as nine other novels and numerous short stories and poems. In addition to providing an overview of Melville's life in relation to his literary works, the book places his writings within their historical and cultural contexts, and then examines each of his major works fully, at the level of the nonspecialist and generalist reader. The chapters that address major works by Melville feature close readings of the literary texts that include analysis of point of view, setting, plot, characters, symbolism, themes, and historical contexts when appropriate. In addition, the four chapters devoted to individual novels, as well as the chapter on Melville's poetry, feature alternate readings to introduce the reader to postcolonial, feminist, genre, reader response, and deconstructionist approaches to literary criticism. The book concludes with an extensive bibliography that includes lists of Melville's published works, biographies, contemporary reviews, and recent critical studies. -Early Narratives, from Typee to White Jacket -Moby Dick -Pierre -The Piazza Tales -Other magazine tales: "I and My Chimney," "The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids," and "Israel Potter" -The Confidence-Man -Poetry, including Battle-Pieces and Clarel -Billy Budd
 

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Contents

III
1
V
11
VII
25
IX
49
XI
65
XII
81
XIV
105
XVI
121
XVIII
135
XX
153
XXII
167
XXIII
185
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About the author (2007)

Sharon Talley is an Associate Professor of English at Texas A&M University -- Corpus Christi, where she teaches Early American literature and cultures. Special research interests include Death and Dying in American Literature, and the American Renaissance.

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