Being and God in Aristotle and Heidegger: The Role of Method in Thinking the Infinite

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2000 - Philosophy - 217 pages
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This enlightening study examines the relationship between being and God in Aristotle and Heidegger. Focusing on the methodology of each thinker, Catriona Hanley contrasts their beliefs on the infinite or finite nature of being, and on GodOs role therein. The author also offers some indication of how modern thinkers might rethink the relation of the finite to the infinite, based on the work of these two philosophers. Being and God in Aristotle and Heidegger is a valuable book for philosophers of religion.
 

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Contents

Aristotles Method The Requirements of a Science
3
I The Meaning of Epistēmē
4
II Aitíai
8
III The Types and Function of Archai
16
IV Epagõgē and Noûs
23
V Epistēmē and Noûs as Héxeis
26
The Science of First Principles and Grounds
35
I Aetiology
37
III Hermeneutic
120
IV Three Discoveries of Phenomenology
127
V Truth
133
Ontology and Finite Temporality
143
I Angst
145
II Death
147
III Anticipatory Resolve
151
IV Care and Temporality
155

II Being qua Being
45
III Ousía
57
Theology in Aristotle
73
I Phúsis
77
II Physics Book Seven
81
III Physics Book Eight
82
IV God in Book Lambda of the Metaphysics
89
Heidegger
101
Heideggers Method Phenomenology As Ontology
105
I Phenomenology
106
II Fundamental Ontology
113
V Practice and Theory
161
VI Transcendence
169
God and Being in Heidegger
179
I God and Grounds
180
II The Infinite
190
Conclusion
203
Bibliography
205
Index
215
About the Author
219
Copyright

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Page 2 - Instead of the groundless, endless prattle about the "reversal," it would be more advisable and fruitful if people would simply engage themselves in the matter. . . . [Ojnly by way of what [Heidegger] I has thought does one gain access to what is to-bethought by [Heidegger] II.
Page ix - Shifting brilliancies. Then winter light In a doorway, and on the stone doorstep A beggar shivering in silhouette. So the particular judgement might be set: Bare wallstead and a cold hearth rained into Bright puddle where the soul-free cloud-life roams. And after the commanded journey, what? Nothing magnificent, nothing unknown. A gazing out from far away, alone. And it is not particular at all, Just old truth dawning: there is no next-time-round. Unroofed scope. Knowledge-freshening wind.

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About the author (2000)

Catriona Hanley is assistant professor of philosophy at Loyola College in Baltimore, Maryland.

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