Learning and science. Literature. Games and pastimes. Religion. Index

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late E. J. Brill, 1906 - Achinese literature
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Page 95 - ... olden time, but whose knowledge, owing to his training and environment, is somewhat greater than that of others; one who is endowed, besides, with a good memory and enthusiasm for the poesy of his country, puts his powers to the test by celebrating in verse the great events of more recent years. Just as a literate poet reads his work again and again, and by the free use of his pen makes it conform more and more to the canons of art, so does our bard by means of incessant recitation. The events...
Page 266 - ... all classes of the Muslim community have exhibited in practice an indifference to the sacred law in all its fulness, quite equal to the reverence with which they regard it in theory.
Page 273 - Archipelago, where it was chiefly moral suasion that won the day. In the latter case the new religion was from the very first felt not as a yoke imposed by a higher power, but as a revealed truth which the strangers brought from beyond the sea, and the knowledge of which at once gave its...
Page 274 - The [indigenous customs] which control the lives of the Bedawins of Arabia, the Egyptians, the Syrians, or the Turks, are for the most part different from those of the Javanese, Malays and Achehnese, but the relation of these [customs] to the law of Islam, and the tenacity with which they maintain themselves in despite of that law, is everywhere the same. The customary law of the Arabs and ... of the Turks differ from the written and unwritten [customary law] of our Indonesians, but they are equally...
Page 272 - ... version. Hurgronje who believed that the first Moslem traders who came to Malaysia had come merely for motives of profit with conversions as a secondary task, reveals a limitation of the trade theory by suggesting that the inner qualities of Islam can provide a clue to the explanation of Islam's spread. Those who sowed in the Far East the first seeds of Islam were no zealots prepared to sacrifice life and property for the holy cause, nor were they missionaries supported by funds in their native...
Page 301 - Islam, which seemed so static, so sunk in a torpid medievalism, was actually changing in fundamental ways, but these changes were so gradual, so subtle, so concentrated in remote and, to non-Islamic minds, unlikely places, that "although they take place before our very eyes, they are hidden from those who do not make a careful study of the subject."8 Today, after four decades of thoroughgoing and quite obvious upheaval in the Indonesian ummat have rendered these words prophetic, the warning they...
Page 95 - ... modify add or omit as he thinks fit or from filling up the gaps from his really subtle poetic vein, whenever his memory fails him. We can here witness for ourselves one of the methods by which an Achehnese heroic poem is brought into the world. Some one man, who like most of his fellow countrymen knows by heart the classic descriptions of certain events and situations as expressed in verse by the people of the olden time, but whose knowledge, owing to his training and environment, is somewhat...
Page 15 - Acheh during the i6th and i/th centuries was merely the result of the political condition of the country, as that period embraces the zenith of the prosperity of the port-kings. Among the authors of these works or among the most celebrated mystics, heretical or orthodox, we do not find a single Achehnese name, but only those of foreign teachers.
Page 279 - Creator, and ordained in this case also certain ritual prayers, to be continued as long as the eclipse lasted. No Mohammedan questions for a moment that the •omnipotence of God reveals itself in these eclipses — indeed no doctrine is more popular than that of the omnipotence of God and predestination — yet in the ranks of the people all kinds of superstitions prevail in regard to such phenomena. In these temporary obscurations of sun and moon they discern the action of malignant spirits and...
Page 282 - Devil or against jens hostile to mankind, of as 'an invocation of the mediation of a prophet or saint with God, then it matters not that the existence of these 'malignant spirits is actually only known from pagan sources, nor does anyone pause to enquire whether the saint in question...

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