Affinities, Volume 1

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Tauchnitz, 1885
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Page 226 - Colquhoun. She had asked him to come. Her attitude was one of expectancy. She stood by the fireplace, her face turned sideways to him as he entered, holding a screen of feathers between her cheeks and the blaze. Her robe of pale-green plush, confined at the waist with an old enamelled girdle, and with soft lace falling away from...
Page 242 - ... What your impulses prompt,' she answered with the least touch of bitterness. ' It is not for me to guide them.' 'I think,' he said, after a minute's pause, ' that perhaps your enthusiasm gilds merely trite facts and common-place sentiment. That is the way with us — we artists. Is your VOL.
Page 199 - Esme ; but of that poetic love, which seemed to have a being apart from material life, and which she knew neither suffering nor starvation could kill. It is a grand power, that of endowing with a sort of objective existence an ideal love which holds its own against disillusiomnents.
Page 151 - ... savoir faire of a woman of the world.' She paints as well as plays and is extremely popular; her friends consider her perfect. Though essentially conservative, she has spirit. 'I know my world too well and I love my world too dearly to go beyond my tether.' 'Keep a strong hold on life,' she advises, 'and you'll force something pleasant out of it. I have contrived to get a good deal, though I made a bad commencement.
Page 90 - ... Warburton and Caspar Goodwood court Isabel, and Ralph Touchett watches over her. The scheming friend and the husband, however, are reproduced by Mrs. Praed on her own scale. A genial accomplished woman is presented to us while playing the piano one evening. 'There was something delightfully fresh . . . in her voice and air, but it was evident that she had all the savoir faire of a woman of the world.
Page 153 - There was something delightfully fresh . . . in her voice and air, but it was evident that she had all the savoir faire of a woman of the world.' She paints as well as plays and is extremely popular; her friends consider her perfect. Though essentially conservative, she has spirit. 'I know my world too well and I love my world too dearly to go beyond my tether.
Page 99 - It was spiritualism and the planchette till that got vulgar. One day it is mesmerism and will-power ; another, thoughtreading ; and now India and America have set the fashion to a school of occultists.
Page 44 - ... firm perhaps in her graver moments, had an enchanting range of concession.' Her suitors appreciated 'her light slim figure, the length of her white neck as she bent her head,' and 'had the entertainment of thinking all the others [who did not] aesthetic vulgarians.' Judith Fountain, in Affinities, 'was slender also, and the poise of her neck was very graceful.
Page 88 - ... had the entertainment of thinking all the others [who did not] aesthetic vulgarians.' Judith Fountain, in Affinities, 'was slender also, and the poise of her neck was very graceful.' She had 'great grey,' 'singularly lucid' eyes. 'To be strongly attracted to this girl seemed to imply a sense not commonly developed among men. She appealed not to the herd.
Page 187 - I always felt that there would come something some day which should drag me imperiously from everything that had gone before, and be a will in me and fill me so that I should be satisfied.

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