Greek Exercises; Or, An Introduction to Greek Composition ...: To which Specimens of the Greek Dialects, and the Critical Canons of Dawes and Poron are Added

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G. and C. and H. Carvill, 1831 - Greek language - 236 pages
 

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Page lxxi - I was never known to receive the successes of my own country, with :remblings, with sighings, with eyes bending to the earth, like those impious men, who are the defamers of the state, as if by such conduct they were not defamers of themselves : who look abroad ; and, when a foreign potentate hath established his power on the calamities of Greece, applaud the event, and tell us we should take every means to perpetuate his power.
Page lxi - Sublime in air, Sublime in thought I carry my mind with me, Its cogitations all assimilated To the pure atmosphere, in which I float ; Lower me to earth, and my mind's subtle powers, Seiz'd by contagious dulness, lose their spirit; For the dry earth drinks up the generous sap, The vegetating vigor of philosophy, And leaves it a mere husk.
Page lxxi - ... and pre-eminence of the state, in. his official conduct ; on all occasions, and in all transactions, an affection for his country. This nature can bestow. Abilities and success depend upon another power. And in this affection you find me firm and invariable. Not the solemn demand of my person...
Page lxxi - And in this affection you find me firm and invariable. Not the solemn demand of my person ; not the vengeance of the Amphictyonic council, which they denounced against me; not the terror of their threatenings; not the flattery of their promises; no, nor the fury of those accursed wretches, whom they roused like wild beasts against me, could ever tear this affection from my breast.
Page lxxi - I confess it : yet still •superior to you all in an affectionate .attachment to my country. There are two distinguishing qualities, Athenians, which the virtuous citizen should ever possess — (I speak in general terms, as the least invidious method...
Page lxxi - I have uniformly pursued the just and virtuous course of conduct; assertor of the honors, of the prerogatives, of the glory of my country ; studious to support them, zealous to advance them, my whole being is devoted to this glorious cause. I was never known to march through the city with a face of joy and exultation at the success of...
Page lxxi - ... immortal gods! and let not these their desires be ratified in heaven ! Infuse a better spirit into these men ! Inspire even their minds with purer sentiments ! — This is my first prayer. — Or, if their natures are not to "be reformed ; on them, on them only discharge your vengeance ! Pursue them both by land and sea ! Pursue them even to destruction ! But to us display your goodness in a speedy deliverance from impending evils, and all the blessings of protection and tranquillity !' 1 The...
Page xc - And I only mention this now, to avoid the appearance which one might otherwise incur of appealing to Homer as an authority for Attic Syntax. Innumerable modes of speech, cultivated by the Poets, and even familiar to the Prose writers of Athens, are drawn from Homer, the vast ocean of Grecian literature. But inasmuch as a great deal of the original diction of Homer had become obsolete in the age of Pericles, and a great deal of recent varnish was afterwards put on by the scholars of Alexandria, let...
Page xciii - And yet beyond a doubt, the detection of ingenious error in clever men affords instruction as well as amusement, if properly considered. The quick may learn modesty, and the slow may derive encouragement, from the very same lesson. 'H/uTi/ о 'A^tXXe actos Tifj, yvvcu, Qavwv -rep yjs *EXXa'os ка'ХХкгт' avrjp. Hecub. 313. " Verte, Dignus Achilles, qui a nobis honorem accipiat.
Page lxxv - And near, two neat-curled youths in amorous strains, With fruitless strife communicate their pains ; Smiling, by turns she views the rival pair ; Grief swells their eyes, their heavy hearts despair. Hard by, a fisherman...

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