The Making Of An Afro-american: Martin Robison Delany, 1812-1885

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Da Capo Press, 1971 - Social Science - 352 pages
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Decades before Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Malcolm X, Martin Robison Delany (1812–1885) proclaimed his pride in being black, and demanded not only emancipation but independence for African Americans. Grandson of an African prince, son of a slave, Delany lived a life of singular achievement: the first African-American explorer to venture into the heart of Africa; the publisher, editor, and writer of one of the first black newspapers in the U.S.; one of the first three blacks admitted to Harvard Medical School; the first black to hold field grade rank of U.S. Army major during the Civil War; as well as prominent careers as an author, doctor, ethnologist, orator, judge, Freedmen's Bureau official, and spokesman for black nationalism. This assiduously researched biography brings into vivid focus the life and times of Delany, whose militant, uncompromising voice is as vital today as it was more than a century ago.
 

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Contents

The Rain and the Thunder
1
Mr Charles Washingtons Town
6
The Peddler Sells a Primer
14
School Days
24
The Smoky City
35
Dr McDowells Apprentice
48
The Search for a Place
56
White Mans Country
62
Black and Proud
147
North of the Border
159
John Brown in Canada
167
Interlude
176
On Behalf of the African Race in America
187
Listen World
208
The Black Major
230
Let Us Cry Glory to God
252

The Mystery
75
Voice in the Wilderness
93
Years of Revolution
107
Let Blacks Be Educated But
122
What Then Shall We Do?
136
A Warning Voice
278
The Spirit of 76
299
Twilight Years
316
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About the author (1971)

Author Dorothy Sterling was born on November 23, 1913 in Manhattan. She received a bachelor's degree from Barnard College in 1934. In the 1940's, she worked as a researcher for Life magazine, but left in frustration at a system under which women researchers gave material to men, who wrote the articles. Her first book, Sophie and Her Puppies, was published in 1951. She wrote more than 35 books for both children and adults throughout her lifetime including Freedom Train (1954), Captain of the Planter: The Story of Robert Smalls (1958), Black Foremothers: Three Lives (1979) and Close to My Heart (2005). She won numerous awards for her work including the 1976 Carter G. Woodson Book Award for The Trouble They Seen: Black People Tell the Story of Reconstruction. She died on December 1, 2008 at the age of 95.

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