Ascanius: Or, The Young Adventurer; Containing an ... Account of the Late Rebellion in Scotland

Front Cover
Weir, 1769 - Great Britain - 286 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 259 - Majesty strongly promised to give me such marks of his favour, as would oblige all the country to be faithful to him. Therefore the gracious King was as good as his word to me ; for as soon...
Page 259 - Scotsman about the court : and I often carried your Royal Highness in my arms, in the parks of Kensington and Hampton court, to hold you up to your royal grandfather, that he might embrace you ; for he was very fond of you and of the young Princesses.
Page 117 - ... this time, Prince Charles was wandering about the mountains and islands, exposed to all the inconveniencies of cold, hunger, thirst, and weariness, yet through the whole course of his distresses, he maintained the most amazing equanimity and good humour. After the Highlanders gave way at Culloden, he was forced off the field by Major Kennedy, and the other officers, while the French forces, and some of the clans, kept the English army for some time at bay, to prevent an immediate pursuit. A great...
Page 101 - His lordship bade him take courage, giving him at the same time a purse, with five guineas, and telling him he would drop his handkerchief as a signal for the stroke. He proceeded with the help of his gentleman, to make ready for the block, by taking off his coat, and the bag from his hair, which was then tucked up under a napkin cap ; but this being too wide, the contracting it occasioned some delay.
Page 251 - You who have flourished under the present happy establishment? — you, who in the beginning of your days forfeited both your life and fortune, and yet by the benignity of the government was not only indulged the liberty of living at home, but even restored to all you could lay claim to. Nay, his majesty's...
Page 94 - I have involved also eight innocent children, who must feel their parent's punishment before they know his guilt. Let them, my Lords, be pledges to his Majesty ; let them be pledges to your Lordships ; let them be pledges to my country for mercy ; let the silent eloquence of their grief and tears — let the powerful language of innocent nature supply my want of eloquence and persuasion ; let me enjoy mercy, but no longer than I deserve it ; and let me no longer enjoy life than I shall use it to...
Page 259 - President, &c. and by those that frequented the court at that time, that I did more essential service to your royal family, in suppressing the great rebellion in the year 1715, with the hazard of my life, and the...
Page 95 - But if after all, my lords, my safety shall be found inconsistent with that of the public, and nothing but my blood can atone for my unhappy crime ; if the sacrifice of my life, my fortune, and family, is judged indispensably necessary for stopping the loud demands of public justice, and if the bitter cup is not to pass from me, not mine, but thy will, O God, be done.t...
Page 102 - He was then told that the neck of his waistcoat was in the way, upon which he rose, and, w-ith the help of a friend, took it off, and the neck being made bare to the shoulders, he kneeled down as before, ——In the mean time, when all things were •ready for the execution, and the black bays which hung over the rails of the scaffold...
Page 127 - M'Leod had bought for them- After which the Prince lay down on the floor, having no other bed than an old sailcloth, and slept very sound; but the crew were obliged to keep a good look-out, by regular watches.

Bibliographic information