Baghdad Without a Map: And Other Misadventures in Arabia

Front Cover
Bloomsbury, 1992 - Middle East - 285 pages
Journalist Tony Horowitz went to Arabia without a job, and spent two years visiting 13 Muslim countries and Israel, writing copy for whoever could be persuaded to take it. Not long after he arrived in Yemen he was advised never to drink the water, eat the food or chew the hallucinatory leaf Qat. Unfortunately Tony had to confess he had already done all three. This book contains Horowitz's often amusing observations and insights as a result of his travels.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
7
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - themythicalcodfish - LibraryThing

While the prose is considerably less polished than his later books, "Baghdad" is still an excellent piece of travel literature from Tony Horwitz. A great deal of the appeal of his writing is how he ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - snash - LibraryThing

The book offers a picture of the Mid-East in the late 1980's. While describing his travels he provides insight on the contradictions and dilemmas of the ordinary people he runs across. He writes with ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (1992)

Anthony Lander Horwitz was born in Washington, D. C. on June 9, 1958. He received a bachelor's degree in history from Brown University and a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1983. After working as a union organizer in Mississippi, he became a newspaper reporter. He was an education reporter for The Fort Wayne News-Sentinel in Indiana from 1983 to 1984 and a general assignment reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald in Australia from 1985 to 1987. He joined The Wall Street Journal in 1990 as a foreign correspondent in Europe and the Middle East. He and his wife Geraldine Brooks won the Overseas Press Club's Hal Boyle Award in 1990 for their coverage of the Persian Gulf war. He returned to the United States in 1993 and was assigned to The Journal's Pittsburgh bureau. He won the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting for his accounts of working conditions in low-wage jobs. He later wrote for The New Yorker on the Middle East before becoming an author of nonfiction books. His first book, Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War, was published in 1998. His other books included Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before, A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World, Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War, and Spying on the South: An Odyssey Across the American Divide. He died on May 27, 2019 at the age of 60.

Bibliographic information