Blood Struggle: The Rise of Modern Indian Nations

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W. W. Norton & Company, 2005 - Social Science - 543 pages
2 Reviews
FOR GENERATIONS, Indian people suffered a grinding poverty and political and cultural suppression on the reservations. But tenacious and visionary tribal leaders refused to give in. They knew their rights and insisted that the treaties be honored. Against all odds, beginning shortly after World War II, they began to succeed. The modern tribal sovereignty movement deserves to be spoken of in the same breath as the civil rights, environmental, and women's movements. Charles Wilkinson recounts in colorful terms tribal victories in major legal conflicts in contemporary America: the Indian land claims in Maine and other eastern states, the "salmon wars" of the Pacific Northwest, and the establishment of tribal casinos as a way of making inroads into poverty. "Blood Struggle explores how Indian tribes took their hard-earned sovereignty--their right to self-determination--and put it to work for Indian peoples and the perpetuation of Indian culture. Finally, this is the story of wrongs righted and noble ideals upheld.
 

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Blood struggle: the rise of modern Indian nations

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A former Native American Rights Fund staff attorney, Wilkinson (law, Univ. of Colorado) provides a comprehensive history of Native American sovereignty as a major American civil rights movement ... Read full review

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Mr. Wilkinson's book skims over the winning of the Public Law 280 issue in South Dakota. It was run and controlled out of the Paulsen Advertising Agency - and given no chance of winning. The Tribal President's met and established a policy which was developed at the agency. They were magnificent. Shots were fired at some of them, threats were made but they never wavered. Cato Valandra, President of the Rosebud Sioux was also President of the United Sioux Tribes. There was a Keep Faith Committee which was chaired by someone from Paulsen's agency. It was this individual who developed the policies and strategies and worked with the Tribal presidents. All public relations, writing and the contents of the film developed on the issue needed this individuals approval. Alvinia Greybear of the Standing Rock Tribe and Dan Howard, Frank Ducheneauxm, Enos Poorbear, President of Pine Ridge, Archbishop Vine Deloria and Sam Deloria were initimately involved in the issue. The land was taken away from Jim Ramey, President Protem of the Senate who lied about the murder of an Indian girl to get the legislation passed. The Governor became involved threatening the person from Paulsen Advertising. The reservations were dried up of any liquor before election day and fed at the polls. When the issue was done the Sioux controlled all the counties with an indian population and the most important man in the State was Cato Valandra, President of the United Sioux.
At that time the Sioux were able to influence Indian education as it was being set up through the Interior Department, They celebrated with a Pow Wow at Pine Ridge and adopted the people who helped them from the Paulsen Advertising Agency. The Sioux President's were magnificent in their discipline and leadership.
Ahawanee
 

Selected pages

Contents

Indian Country August 1953
3
The Deadening Years
27
Termination
57
LAST STAND
87
The Making of a Movement
89
Leadership on the Reservations
113
Red Power
129
The Salmon People
150
Revitalizing Tribal Communities
271
Stewards of the Land
304
Casino Lights and the Quandary of Indian Economic Progress
329
Preserving the Old Ways
352
The Outlook
383
NOTES
385
State and Federally Recognized Tribes
487
Largest Landholding Tribes
498

FOUNDATIONS for SELFDETERMINATION
175
Turning Points
177
Reclaiming Heartlands
206
Sovereignty in Congress and trie Courts
241
Most Populous Tribes
499
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
501
INDEX
507
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About the author (2005)

Charles Wilkinson is an award-winning filmmaker and author of, most recently, The Working Film Director, (2nd edition MW Press in LA). He lives in Vancouver.

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