The Custom of the Country

Front Cover
Little, Brown Book Group Limited, Feb 28, 2007 - 352 pages

If only I were sure of knowing what to expect!' he caught up at her joke, tossing it back at her across the fascinating silence of their listeners.
'Why everything!' she announced

With the intention of making a suitable match, Undine Spragg and her parents move to New York where her youthful, radiant beauty and ruthless ambition prove an irrestible force. Here Edith Wharton dissects the traditions, pretensions and prohibitions of American and European society - both the ostentacious glitter of the 'nouveau riche' and the faded grandeur of the upper classes - with an eye on all the more exacting for its dispassionate gaze. And in Undine Spragg she has created an unforgettable heroine - a woman taught to dazzle and enslave, but to know nothing of the financial and social cost of the status she so passionately craves.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jaysbooks - LibraryThing

about a horrible, selfish social climber--main character is so annoying that I could barely force myself to finish the book--proves that women today are lucky to be educated with careers so they can divert their energy toward better things than parties clothes and status Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DeltaQueen50 - LibraryThing

The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton tells the story of Undine Spragg, a Midwestern girl who attempts to scale the heights of New York City society. Undine is one of the most unique characters I ... Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Edith Wharton (1862-1937), friend and contemporary of Henry James, was born in New York but spent her later life in France. She won two Pulitzer prizes and was probably the most accomplished American novelist of her generation.

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