The Oregon Trail

Front Cover
Penguin, 1849 - Travel - 463 pages
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On April 28, 1846, Francis Parkman left Saint Louis on his first expedition west. The Oregon Trail documents his adventures in the wilderness, sheds light on America's westward expansion, and celebrates the American spirit.
 

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User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

Written in 1847, this is an eye witness account of the prairie and the natives who lived there. Unlike our romantic view of native life, this is somewhat disdainful, and yet he admires them in a way ... Read full review

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Contents

The Frontier
37
Breaking the Ice
46
Fort Leaven worth
58
Jumping Off
62
The Big Blue
75
The Platte and the Desert
95
The Buffalo
111
Taking French Leave
130
The Hunting Camp
275
The Trappers
301
The Black Hills
313
A Mountain Hunt
318
Passage of the Mountains
332
The Lonely Journey
352
The Pueblo and Bents Fort
375
Tete Rouge the Volunteer
384

Scenes at Fort Laramie
148
The War Parties
167
Scenes at the Camp
192
IllLuck
214
Hunting Indians
223
The Ogillallah Village
251
Indian Alarms
390
The Chase
403
The Buffalo Camp
414
Down the Arkansas
432
The Settlements
452
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About the author (1849)

Francis Parkman was born in Boston in 1823 and is best known for his masterly seven-volume history, France and England in North America, and for the annual prize awarded by the Society of American Historians in his honor. He died in 1893.

David Levin was the Commonwealth Professor of English at the University of Virginia. His books on American historical writing included History as Romatic Art: Bancroft, Prescott, Motley, and Parkman; In Defense of Historical Literature; and Cotton Mather: The Young Life of the Lord's Remembrancer, 1663-1703. He was the editor of Francis Parkman's masterpiece, France and England in North America.