Contemporary Anarchism

Front Cover
Terry M. Perlin
Transaction Publishers - Political Science - 294 pages

Anarchism--literally, a society without government--is less a political philosophy than it is a temperament. Anarchists are defiant people who seek to organize for the purpose of destroying organization. For its adherents, anarchism means a grand struggle against evil, a plea for the "new," a secular crusade against the debasement of self, a fight against the degradation of mankind that organized society seems to represent. Anarchism is anti-politics, anti-economics, anti-authoritarianism in all forms. Anarchism is a mood of perpetual rebellion.

The decade of the sixties witnessed a revival in the anarchist temperament, which Perlin finds evident in such diverse efforts as the women's liberation movement, student demonstrations, civil rights marches, free schools, the "back to the land" movement, demands for birth control and other--usually controversial-causes and activities. This new anarchism had few conscious links with the old anarchism. It was instead a response to changed conditions in the social fabric of American and European life, a reflex to the structural, cultural and psychological tensions that made those years turbulent, strife-filled and rebellious.

Perlin concludes that while a revolution was not made in the sixties, a revolutionary life-style became a possibility. The spokesmen for the marginal groups whose interests achieved a new kind of legitimacy during the sixties were anarchists or their sympathizers. A representative cross-section of their writings is included in this volume.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Recurrence of Defiance
3
The Revival
21
Anarchism Revisited
23
The Relevance of Anarchism to Modern Society
37
Anarchism on the Left
51
Letter to the New Left
53
The Movement A New Beginning
65
The Anarchist Revolution
85
Black Anarchy in New York
167
A New Consciousness and Its Polemics
177
Some Secular Myths
191
A Religious View of Anarchism
195
Man the Creator and Destroyer
199
Education and the Democratic Myth
203
The Machinery of Conformity
207
Towards Workers Control
221

The Red Flag and the Black
93
Libertarianism
109
The Transformation of the American Right
111
The Anatomy of the State
127
Why Be Libertarian?
151
Doing Anarchism
157
Anarchists And Proud of It
159
Why Terror Is Not an Anarchist Means
163
From Manifesto for a Nonviolent Revolution A Draft for Discussion
231
Anarchism as Critique and Possibility
243
From Revolution A Quaker Prescription for a Sick Society
245
PostScarcity Anarchism
257
The Conspiracy of Law
273
Sources
289
Index
291
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information