Lords of the Lebanese Marches: Violence & Narrative in an Arab Society

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I.B.Tauris, 1996 - History - 377 pages
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Lords of the Lebanese Marches looks at relations between different forms of power, violence and hierarchy in Akkar, the northernmost province of Lebanon, during the 1970s. Often regarded as "backward" and "feudal," in reality this area was controlled mainly by groups with important roles in government and business in Beirut. Using both material collected during his stay in Akkar and a variety of historical sources, Gilsenan analyzes the practices that guaranteed the rule of the large landowners and traces shifts in the discourses of domination in the area. He also examines the importance of narratives and rhetoric in constituting social honor, collective biography and shared memory/forgetting.
  

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Contents

One
3
Two
23
Contexts and Contests
38
PART TWO State and Local Narratives 5 5
55
Narratives Powers Persons
57
Fathomless Ocean
67
Precarious Archaism
79
Underdeveloped Periphery
95
Callous Story or Dirty Deed
159
Marching in the Wrong Direction
189
Joking Play and Pressure
206
The Perils of Display
231
A Killing in the Street
250
PART FIVE Imperatives of Work
263
The Challenge of Work and Wages
265
Horsemen on Tractors
281

PART THREE The Weight of the Ancestors
113
Famine and Memory
115
Fellahin and Famine
140
PART FOUR Marvellous Stories Dirty Deeds
157
CODA The Roses of Life
299
Notes to Chapters 222
322
Bibliography
361
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Michael Gilsenan is Professor of Anthropology and Near Eastern Languages and Literatures at New York University and is Emeritus Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford.

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