An Ethical Philosophy of Life

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D. Appleton, 1918 - Ethics - 380 pages
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Page 187 - THERE is nothing which so generally strikes the imagination, and engages the affections of mankind, as the right of . property ; or that sole and despotic dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world} in total exclusion of the right of any other individual in the universe.
Page 260 - Me : I am the way, the truth, and the life. Without the way, there is no going ; without the truth, there is no knowing ; without the life, there is no living.
Page 362 - I affirm that there verily is an eternal divine life, a best beyond the best I can think or imagine, in which all that is best in me, and best in those who are dear to me, is contained and continued. In this sense I bUss the universe. And to be able to bless the universe in one's last moments is the supreme prize which man can wrest from life's struggles, life's experience
Page 359 - But his is too profound a nature to take outer recognition too seriously. Like his judgments of others, his judgment of himself is stern: "I look back on my life and its net results. I have seen spiritual ideals, and the more clearly I saw them, the wider appeared the distance between them and the empirical conditions, the changes I could effect in those conditions. I have worked in social reform, and the impression I have been able to make now seems to me so utterly insignificant as to make my early...
Page 101 - Worth signifies indispensableness in a perfect whole. No detached thing has worth. No part of an incomplete system has worth. Worth belongs to those to whom it is attributed in so far as they are conceived of as not to be spared, as representing a distinctive, indispensable preciousness, a mode of being without which perfection would be less than perfect.
Page 360 - ... conditions, the changes I could effect in those conditions. I have worked in social reform, and the impression I have been able to make now seems to me so utterly insignificant as to make my early sanguine aspirations appear pathetic. ... I scrutinize closely my relations to those who have been closest to me — and I find that I have been groping in the dark with respect to their most real needs, and that my faculty of divination has been feeble. I look lastly into my heart, my own character,...
Page 10 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested : that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 361 - Or rather, as my last act, I affirm that the ideal of perfection which my mind inevitably conceives has its counterpart in the ultimate reality of things, is the truest reading of that reality whereof man is capable. I turn away from the thought of...
Page 233 - The spiritual nature in another is the fair quality distinctive of that other raised toward the Nth degree. We are to paint ideal portraits of our spiritual associates. We are to see them in the light of what is better in them as it would be if it were transfigured into the best.
Page 13 - A Union for the Higher Life," based on three tacit assumptions: Sex purity, the principle of devoting the surplus of one's income beyond that required for one's own genuine needs to the elevation of the working class, and thirdly, continued intellectual development. Now...

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