The Age of Transition, 1400-1580, Volume 2

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Page xxiii - A voice so thrilling ne'er was heard In spring-time from the Cuckoo-bird, Breaking the silence of the seas Among the farthest Hebrides. Will no one tell me what she sings? Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow For old, unhappy, far-off things, And battles long ago: Or is it some more humble lay, Familiar matter of to-day?
Page xvi - And all his greaves and cuisses dash'd with drops Of onset ; and the light and lustrous curls — That made his forehead like a rising sun High from the...
Page 63 - My father was a yeoman, and had no lands of his own, only he had a farm of three or four pound by year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walk for a hundred sheep ; and my mother milked thirty kine.
Page 64 - In my time, my poor father was as diligent to teach me to Shoot, as to learn me any other thing, and so I think other men did their children. He taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength of arms as other nations do, but with strength of the body.
Page vii - Such notes as, warbled to the string, Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek, And made Hell grant what love did seek ; Or call up him that left half -told The story of Cambuscan bold, Of Camball, and of Algarsife, And who had Canace to wife, That owned the virtuous ring and glass, And of the wondrous Horse of Brass, On which the Tartar king did ride...
Page 66 - I would ask a strange question: who is the most diligentest bishop and prelate in all England, that passeth all the rest in doing his office? I can tell, for I know him who it is; I know him well. But now I think I see you listening and hearkening that I should name him. There is one that passeth all the other, and is the most diligent prelate and preacher in all England. And will ye know who it is?
Page 109 - Therefore, when I consider and weigh in my mind all these commonwealths which nowadays anywhere do flourish, so God help me, I can perceive nothing but a certain conspiracy of rich men procuring their own commodities under the name and title of the commonwealth.
Page 27 - Regarding your substance and riches chief of all ; For your personage, beauty, demeanour and wit, I commend me unto you never a whit. Sorry to hear report of your good welfare, For, (as I hear say) such your conditions are, That ye be worthy favour of no living man ; To be abhorred of every honest man. To be taken for a woman inclined to vice ; Nothing at all to virtue giving her due price.
Page 50 - I defer to speak at this time and understood at the last not only that there was no room in my lord of London's palace to translate the new testament, but also that there was no place to do it in all England, as experience doth now openly declare.
Page 4 - He beareth the keys and thereof hath the cure ; ** For man's redemption it is ever sure, Which God for our soul's medicine Gave us out of His heart with great...

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