Rudyard Kipling

Front Cover
Henry Holt, 1915 - 127 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 85 - Fair youth , beneath the trees , thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare;' Bold lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal — yet, do not grieve ; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love , and she be fair ! Ah, happy, happy boughs!
Page 54 - Ravee without the walls. Shows lastly a splash of glittering silver on a house-top almost directly below the mosque Minar. Some poor soul has risen to throw a jar of water over his fevered body; the tinkle of the falling water strikes faintly on the ear.
Page 53 - IN THE HOUSE OF SUDDHOO A stone's throw out on either hand From that well-ordered road we tread, And all the world is wild and strange : Cburel and ghoul and Djinn and sprite Shall bear us company to-night, For we have reached the Oldest Land Wherein the powers of Darkness range. From the Dusk to the Dawn. THE house of Suddhoo, near the Taksali Gate, is two-storied, with four carved windows of old brown wood, and a flat roof.
Page 55 - Eavee itself! Even across the courtyard it is almost overpowering. The cloud drifts by and shows him outlined in black against the sky, hands laid upon his ears, and broad chest heaving with the play of his lungs — 'Allah ho Akbar...
Page 39 - Service. These die, or kill themselves by overwork, or are worried to death or broken in health and hope in order that the land may be protected from death and sickness, famine and war, and may eventually become capable of standing alone. It will never stand alone, but the idea is a pretty one, and men are willing to die for it, and yearly the work of pushing and coaxing and scolding and petting the country into good living goes forward. If an advance be made all credit is given to the native, while...
Page 108 - See you our little mill that clacks, So busy by the brook? She has ground her corn and paid her tax Ever since Domesday Book.
Page 39 - Year by year England sends out fresh drafts for the first fighting-line, which is officially called the Indian Civil Service. These die, or kill themselves by overwork, or are worried to death, or broken in health and hope in order that the land may be protected from death and sickness, famine and war, and may eventually become capable of standing alone. It will never stand alone, but the idea is a pretty one, and men are willing to die for it, and yearly the work of pushing and coaxing and scolding...
Page 59 - This is the story of a man who wilfully stepped beyond the safe limits of decent every-day society, and paid for it heavily. He knew too much in the first instance; and he saw too much in the second. He took too deep an interest in native life; but he will never do so again.
Page 123 - OUT OF INDIA. Things I Saw, and Failed to See, in Certain Days and Nights at Jeypore and Elsewhere. 12mo, original decorated cloth. New York, 1895 FINE COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION. The First Collected Edition of "The City of Dreadful Night,
Page 119 - A FLEET IN BEING. Notes of Two Trips with the Channel Squadron.

Bibliographic information