The Elocutionist's Annual ...: Comprising New and Popular Readings, Recitations, Declamations, Dialogues, Tableaux, Etc., Etc, Issue 11

Front Cover
National School of Elocution and Oratory, 1883 - Recitations
0 Reviews

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 112 - When he made a decree for the rain, and a way for the lightning of the thunder ; Then did he see it, and declare it ; he prepared it, yea, and searched it out.
Page 111 - Man knoweth not the price thereof; neither is it found in the land of the living. The depth saiih, It is not in me : and the sea saith, It is not with me.
Page 149 - The armaments which thunderstrike the walls Of rock-built cities, bidding nations quake, And monarchs tremble in their capitals, The oak leviathans, whose huge ribs make Their clay creator the vain title take Of lord of thee, and arbiter of war; These are thy toys, and, as the snowy flake, They melt into thy yeast of waves, which mar Alike the Armada's pride, or spoils of Trafalgar.
Page 162 - Backward, turn backward, O Time, in your flight, Make me a child again, just for to-night ! Mother, come back from the echoless shore, Take me again to your heart, as of yore ; Kiss from my forehead the furrows of care, Smooth the few silver threads out of my hair ; Over my slumbers your loving watch keep ; — Rock me to sleep...
Page 89 - Sir, I know the uncertainty of human affairs, but I see, I see clearly through this day's business. You and I, indeed, may rue it. We may not live to the time when this declaration shall be made good. We may die ; die colonists ; die slaves ; die, it may be, ignominiously and on the scaffold.
Page 88 - The war, then, must go on. We must fight it through. And if the war must go on, why put off longer the Declaration of Independence ? That measure will strengthen us.
Page 87 - Sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish, I give my hand and my heart to this vote. It is true, indeed*, that in the beginning we aimed not at Independence.
Page 89 - We may not live to the time, when this declaration shall be made good. We may die ; die, colonists ; die, slaves ; die, it may be, ignominiously and on the scaffold. Be it so. Be it so. If it be the pleasure of Heaven that my country shall require the poor offering of my life, the victim shall be ready, at the appointed hour of sacrifice, come when that hour may. But while I do live, let me have a country, or at least the hope of a country, and that a free country.
Page 89 - But whatever may be our fate, be assured — be assured that this declaration will stand. It may cost treasure, and it may cost' blood ; but it will stand, and it will richly compensate for both.
Page 149 - The wrecks are all thy deed, nor doth remain A shadow of man's ravage, save his own, When, for a moment, like a drop of rain, He sinks into thy depths with bubbling groan. Without a grave, unknell'd, uncoffin'd, and unknown.

Bibliographic information