The Russian Government in Poland: With a Narrative of the Polish Insurrection of 1863

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Longmans, Green, Reader, & Dyer, 1867 - Europe - 333 pages
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Page 289 - ... arrangements were practically administered from that time down to the revolt in 1830. But upon the suppression of that revolt by the success of the Imperial arms, those arrangements were swept away, and a totally different order of things was by the Imperial authority established. Prince Gortchakoff argues, as his predecessors in office have on former occasions argued, that the suppression of that revolt cancelled all the engagements of Russia in the treaty of Vienna with regard to the kingdom...
Page 150 - Her Majesty's Government view with the deepest concern the state of things now existing in the Kingdom of Poland. They see there, on the one side, a large mass of the population in open insurrection against the Government; and, on the other, a vast military force employed in putting that insurrection down. The natural and probable result of such a contest must be expected to be the success of the military forces. But that success, if it is to be achieved by a series of bloody conflicts, must be attended...
Page 297 - Government would deem themselves guilty of great presumption if they were to express an assurance that vague declarations of good intentions, or even the enactment of some wise laws, would make such an impression on the minds of the Polish people as to obtain peace and restore obedience. In present circumstances, it appears to Her Majesty's Government that nothing less than the following outline of measures should be adopted as the bases of pacification : 1. Complete and general amnesty. 2. National...
Page 307 - November, 1815. (3) Poles to be named to public offices in such a manner as to form a distinct national administration having the confidence of the country. (4) Full and entire liberty of conscience; repeal of the restrictions imposed on Catholic worship. (5) The Polish language recognized...
Page 307 - Gortchakoff, it remains to Her Majesty's Government to discharge an imperative duty. It is to call his Excellency's most serious attention to the gravity of the situation, and the responsibility which it imposes upon Russia. Great Britain, Austria, and France have pointed out the urgent necessity of putting an end to a deplorable state of things which is full of danger to Europe. They have at the same time indicated the means which, in their opinion, ought to be employed to arrive at this termination,...
Page 150 - ... population in open insurrection against the Government; and, on the other, a vast military force employed in putting that insurrection down. The natural and probable result of such a contest must be expected to be the success of the military forces. But that success, if it is to be achieved by a series of bloody conflicts, must be attended by a lamentable effusion of blood, by a deplorable sacrifice of life, by wide-spread desolation, and by impoverishment and ruin, which it would take a long...
Page 292 - Vienna it is stipulated that the Poles, subjects respectively of Russia, Austria, and Prussia, shall obtain a national representation and institutions regulated according to the kind of political existence which each of the Governments to which they belong shall think it useful and fitting to grant them.
Page 29 - In the name of His commandments, we all unite as brothers. Hasten, O Lord, the moment of resurrection ! Bless with liberty those who now mourn in slavery ! At Thy altar we raise our prayer: deign to restore us, O Lord, our free country ! 6.
Page 298 - The Polish language recognized in the kingdom as the official language, and used as such in the administration of the law and in education. 6. The establishment of a regular and legal system of recruiting. These six points might serve as the indications of measures to be adopted, after calm and full deliberation. But it is difficult, nay, almost impossible, to create the requisite confidence and calm while the passions of men are becoming daily more excited, their hatreds more deadly, their determination...

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