Free to Die for Their Country: The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II

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University of Chicago Press, 2001 - History - 229 pages
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One of the Washington Post's Top Nonfiction Titles of 2001

In the spring of 1942, the federal government forced West Coast Japanese Americans into detainment camps on suspicion of disloyalty. Two years later, the government demanded even more, drafting them into the same military that had been guarding them as subversives. Most of these Americans complied, but Free to Die for Their Country is the first book to tell the powerful story of those who refused. Based on years of research and personal interviews, Eric L. Muller re-creates the emotions and events that followed the arrival of those draft notices, revealing a dark and complex chapter of America's history.
 

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Free to die for their country: the story of the Japanese American draft resisters in World War II

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In the many books written about the Japanese American internment during World War II, one aspect that has not been treated in much detail is what happened when the U.S. military decided to draft the ... Read full review

Contents

Untold Patriotism
1
Uneasy Welcome
8
Injury
17
Insult to Injury
41
Reaction
64
Jails within Jails
100
A Shock to the Conscience
131
Incarceration Redux
161
Pardon?
176
Afterword
193
Notes
199
Index
219
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About the author (2001)

Eric L. Muller is a professor of law at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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