200 Years of Syntax: A Critical Survey

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John Benjamins Publishing, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 551 pages
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This book argues convincingly against the widespread opinion that very few syntactic studies were carried out before the 1950s. Relying on the detailed analysis of a large amount of original sources, it shows that syntactic matters were in fact carefully investigated throughout both the 19th century and during the first half of the 20th century. Moreover, it illustrates how the enormous development of syntactic research in the last fifty years has already condemned even several recent ideas and analyses to oblivion, and deeply influenced current research programs. The wealth of research undertaken over the last two centuries is presented here in a systematic way, taking as its starting point the relationship of syntax with psychology throughout this period. The critical ideas expressed in the text are based on a detailed illustration of the different syntactic models and analyses rather than on the polemics between the different schools.
 

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Contents

The rise and fall of psychologistic syntax
15
What is syntax?
73
The analyses of the sentence and of the word groups
111
The role of syntax in the structuralist systems
167
Structuralist approaches to sentence analysis
227
The techniques of syntactic description
263
The shaping of syntactic theories
309
Different views of syntax
369
The Chomskian program
425
References
487
Index of names
519
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