The Literary World

Front Cover
S.R. Crocker, 1879 - Literature
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Yes I want to renew my subscription definitely and for lifetime
Thanks

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 136 - They give to all who will faithfully use them the society, the spiritual presence, of the best and greatest of our race. No matter how poor I am, no matter though the prosperous of my own time will not enter my obscure dwelling, if...
Page 204 - The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty ! make thick my blood ; Stop up...
Page 293 - To be strong-backed and neat-bound is the desideratum of a volume. Magnificence comes after. This, when it can be afforded, is not to be lavished upon all kinds of books indiscriminately.
Page 325 - The good book of the hour, then, — I do not speak of the bad ones, — is simply the useful or pleasant talk of some person whom you cannot otherwise converse with, printed for you. Very useful often, telling you what you need to know; very pleasant often, as a sensible friend's present talk would be.
Page 325 - He is bound to say it, clearly and melodiously if he may; clearly, at all events. In the sum of his life he finds this to be the thing, or group of things, manifest to him; — this the piece of true knowledge, or sight, which his share of sunshine and earth has permitted him to seize. He would fain set it down...
Page 29 - Homer were reading of my own election, but my mother forced me, by steady daily toil, to learn long chapters of the Bible by heart, as well as to read it every syllable through, aloud, hard names and all, from Genesis to the Apocalypse, about once a year ; and to that discipline — patient, accurate, and resolute — I owe not only a knowledge of the book', which I find occasionally serviceable, but much of my general power of taking pains, and the best part of my taste in literature.
Page 136 - No matter how poor I am. No matter though the prosperous of my own time will not enter my obscure dwelling. If the Sacred Writers will enter and take up their abode under my roof ; if Milton will cross my threshold to sing to me of Paradise, and...
Page 309 - I knew a very wise man that believed that if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation.
Page 135 - As one that for a weary space has lain Lulled by the song of Circe and her wine In gardens near the pale of Proserpine, Where that /Eaean isle forgets the main, And only the low lutes of love complain, And only shadows of wan lovers pine, As such an one were glad to know the brine Salt on his lips, and the large air again...
Page 293 - How beautiful to a genuine lover of reading are the sullied leaves, and wornout appearance, nay, the very odour (beyond Russia), if we would not forget kind feelings in fastidiousness, of an old " Circulating Library" Tom Jones, or Vicar of Wakefield\ How they speak of the thousand thumbs, that have turned over their pages with delight!

Bibliographic information