Death of Dignity: Angola's Civil War

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Pluto Press, 1998 - Angola - 128 pages
Angola has been embroiled in internal conflict since 1975. Yet despite countless casualties, two million displaced people and over 500,000 refugees, Western media have paid scant attention. This account provides an outline of key events and figures in recent Angolan history, offering first-hand reportage of how the revolution was deliberately derailed and the fabric of Angola systematically destroyed. Victoria Brittain describes the bombings and sabotage following Angola's invasion by South Africa in 1975 and examines the subsequent deployment of Cuban troops and the Soviet-supported MPLA's confrontations with a militia backed by the US, Morocco and Zaire. She looks at how Savimba's UNITA movement became a formidable army, and reveals his regime in Angola to be as brutal as the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. The author argues that the terrorism of thousands of people and their human rights violations have been largely hidden from the world by US-driven propaganda portraying Savimbi as a democrat.
 

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Contents

Birth of Africas Brightest Hope 197576
1
The Remaking of Unita 197685
10
A War of Ideology 198587
20
Havanas Last Stand 198789
34
Losing the Peace 199192
44
Another Somalia the War of the Cities 199294
58
The State Destroyed 199596
80
Epilogue The Kabila Factor 1997
96
Bibliography
103
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About the author (1998)

Victoria Brittain lived and worked as a journalist in Washington, Nairobi, Saigon, Algiers and London, and has travelled extensively in Africa and the Middle East. She worked at the Guardian for 20 years. She is author of Death of Dignity: Angola's Civil War (1997), co-author of Moazzam Begg's Guantanamo memoir, Enemy Combatant (2006) and author and co-author of two verbatim plays.

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