Blade Runner

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Ballantine Books, 1982 - Fiction - 216 pages
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It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill.
Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignmet--find them and then..."retire" them. Trouble was, the androids all looked exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found!
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
13
Section 3
25
Section 4
33
Section 5
46
Section 6
59
Section 7
67
Section 8
82
Section 13
143
Section 14
152
Section 15
164
Section 16
182
Section 17
194
Section 18
201
Section 19
214
Section 20
223

Section 9
95
Section 10
110
Section 11
119
Section 12
127
Section 21
226
Section 22
234
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Phillip Kindred Dick was an American science fiction writer best known for his psychological portrayals of characters trapped in illusory environments. Born in Chicago, Illinois, on December 16, 1928, Dick worked in radio and studied briefly at the University of California at Berkeley before embarking on his writing career. His first novel, Solar Lottery, was published in 1955. In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for his novel, The Man in the High Castle. He also wrote a series of futuristic tales about artificial creatures on the loose; notable of these was Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which was later adapted into film as Blade Runner. Dick also published several collections of short stories. He died of a stroke in Santa Ana, California, in 1982.

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