Blade Runner

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Ballantine Books, 1982 - Fiction - 216 pages
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It was January 2021, and Rick Deckard had a license to kill.
Somewhere among the hordes of humans out there, lurked several rogue androids. Deckard's assignmet--find them and then..."retire" them. Trouble was, the androids all looked exactly like humans, and they didn't want to be found!
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
13
Section 3
25
Section 4
33
Section 5
46
Section 6
59
Section 7
67
Section 8
82
Section 13
143
Section 14
152
Section 15
164
Section 16
182
Section 17
194
Section 18
201
Section 19
214
Section 20
223

Section 9
95
Section 10
110
Section 11
119
Section 12
127
Section 21
226
Section 22
234
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Philip K. Dick (1928-1982) was an American science-fiction novelist, short-story writer and essayist. A contemporary of Ursula K. Le Guin, Dick's first short story, "Beyond Lies the Wub," was published shortly after his high-school graduation. Many of Dick's works drew upon his personal experiences with drug abuse, addressing topics such as paranoia and schizophrenia, transcendental experiences and alternate reality, and the childhood death of his twin sister is reflected through the recurring theme of the "phantom twin" in many of his novels. Despite ongoing financial troubles and issues with the IRS, Dick had a prolific writing career, winning both the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award multiple times. Some of his most famous novels and stories--A Scanner Darkly, "The Minority Report," "Paycheck," and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (adapted into the film Blade Runner)--have been adapted for film. Dick died in 1982.

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