The Political Economy of Regionalism

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Psychology Press, 1997 - Business & Economics - 491 pages
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This book examines the effects of economic and political restructuring on regions in Europe and North America. The main theses are: international economic restructuring and its impact on regions; political realignments at the regional level; questions of territorial identity and their connection with class, gender and neighbourhood identity; policy choices and policy conflicts in regional development.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Political Economy of Regionalism
17
State Traditions Administrative Reform
41
Regional Policy and European Governance
63
New Dimensions of Regional Policy in Western
77
An International Relations Perspective
90
Territory Identity and Language
112
Regional Planning and Urban Governance in Europe
139
Regional Economic Development and Political
262
Regions in the New Germany
275
Local Political Classes and Economic Development
306
From the Regionalized State to the Emergence
347
Reorganizing
370
A Developing Political Economy
388
Scotland the Union State and the International
406
The North of England and the Europe of the Regions
422

Perspectives
171
CASE STUDIES
195
Competitive Regionalism in Australia Sub
215

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About the author (1997)

The Canadian Global Change Program is Canada's premier science group on global environmental issues. Its mission is to promote informed action through sound advice on global change. Founded in 1985 under the auspices of the Royal Society of Canada, it is a non-governmental organization bringing
together scientists and other specialists from many disciplines to plan interdisciplinary research, assess its significance and communicate the implications. Michael Keating is a journalist whose experience includes nine years as environment reporter for the Globe and Mail.

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