Autonomy and Community: The Royal Manor of Havering, 1200-1500

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 27, 2002 - Business & Economics - 336 pages
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This history of the English royal manor of Havering, Essex, illustrates life at one extreme of the spectrum of personal and collective freedom during the later Middle Ages, revealing the kinds of patterns which could emerge when medieval people were placed in a setting of unusual independence. As residents of a manor held by the crown, they profited from royal administrative neglect. As tenants of the ancient royal demesne, they had special legal rights and economic privileges. Havering's dominant families controlled the legal and administrative life of their community through the powerful manor court. The tenants combined effectively to prevent outside interference in their affairs, despite the individualistic self-interest manifest in their economic dealings. In 1465 the tenants obtained a royal charter which established Havering as a formal Liberty, with its own justices of the peace. By the end of the fifteenth century Havering displayed many characteristics commonly associated with the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods.
 

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Contents

ROYAL PROFIT AND THE PRIVILEGES OF THE ANCIENT DEMESNE 120065
13
ROYAL GAIN AND TENANTS RIGHTS
15
THE PRIVILEGES OF THE ANCIENT DEMESNE
42
EXTERNAL DEMANDS AND HAVERINGS RESISTANCE 12651500
50
ROUTINE SUPERVISION BY THE CROWN
51
RESISTANCE TO SEIGNEURIAL DEMANDS
57
LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL
66
HAVERING AND THE PEASANTS REVOLT
76
THE MANOR COURT AND THE RESOLUTION OF LOCAL PROBLEMS 13521460
181
MANOR COURT ROLLS COMMUNITY AND CONFLICT
182
THE CROWN AS LORD
185
LOCAL CONFLICT
191
COMMUNITY CONCERNS AND PUBLIC ORDER
201
USE OF THE COURT AND THE PLACE OF WOMEN
215
NEW PROBLEMS NEW SOLUTIONS THE LIBERTY OF HAVERINGATTEBOWER 14601500
221
INTENSIFIED CAPITAL INVESTMENT AND SPECIALISATION
223

ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES 12511460
87
DIFFERENTIATED LANDHOLDING AND THE POPULATION 12511460
89
ASSARTING AND LANDHOLDING 1O6613523
90
LAND TENURE INHERITANCE AND TRANSFERS 135231460
116
HAVERINGS PEOPLE 12511460
126
A COMMERCIAL ECONOMY 13501460
136
AGRICULTURE
137
CRAFT TRADE AND ROMFORD MARKET
152
WAGE LABOUR
160
CASH COVENANTS AND CREDIT
166
THE ECONOMIC ROLES OF WOMEN
170
INDIVIDUALISM AND ECONOMIC CHANGE
176
COMMUNITY CONFLICT AND CHANGE 13521500
179
LAY CONTROL OVER RELIGION AND CHARITY
235
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE LIBERTY 1465
240
SELFGOVERNMENT AND SOCIETY
244
CONCLUSION
261
OFFICIALS OF THE MANOR PALACE PARK AND LIBERTY OF HAVERING 12001500
265
HAVERING CASES HEARD IN THE CENTRAL COURTS 11991499
275
SURVIVING ROLLS OF THE HAVERING MANOR COURT TO 1500
277
PRIESTS AND CLERKS IN THE PARISH OF HORNCHURCH 12001500
280
MINIMUM NUMBERS OF HAVERING CRAFTS AND TRADESPEOPLE 12001499
285
BIBLIOGRAPHY
289
INDEX
301
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About the author (2002)

Marjorie Keniston McIntosh is Distinguished Professor of History Emerita at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her previous publications include Controlling Misbehavior in England, 1370 1600 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), Working Women in English Society, 1300 1620 (Cambridge University Press, 2005) and two books about colonial and postcolonial African women.

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