A key to the classical pronunciation of Greek and Latin proper names. To which is added, a complete vocabulary of Scripture proper names. Concluding with Observations on the Greek and Latin accent and quantity

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Robinsons, T. Cadell, and W. Davies, 1798 - Names in the Bible - 168 pages
 

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Page 86 - You all did see, that on the Lupercal, I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse.
Page 137 - Muse, that, on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That Shepherd who first taught the chosen seed In the beginning how the heavens and earth Rose out of Chaos...
Page 145 - ... lower ; this is pronouncing according to Mr. Sheridan's definition of accent : and this pronunciation certainly comes under the definition of singing : it is singing ill, indeed, as Julius Caesar said of a bad reader, — but still it is singing, and therefore essentially different from speaking ; for in speaking, the voice is continually sliding upwards or downwards ; and in singing, it is leaping, as it were, from a lower to a higher, or from a higher to a lower note : the only two possible...
Page 157 - ... hear in our own language : the third is, to pronounce the accented syllable with the falling inflexion, 'and the unaccented syllables with the rising, in a lower tone : and the fourth to pronounce the accented syllable with the rising inflexion, and the unaccented with the falling, in a lower tone. None of these modes, but the first and last, do we ever hear in our own language : the second and third seem too difficult to permit us to suppose that they could be the natural current of the human...
Page xx - own language, pronounce doubled consonants as. distinctly as " the two most discordant mutes of their alphabet. Whatever, " therefore, they may want of expressing the true harmony of " the Latin language, they certainly avoid the most glaring and " absurd faults in our manner of pronouncing it. . " It is a matter of curiosity to observe with what regularity " we use these solecisms in the pronunciation of Latin. When" the penultimate is accented, its vowel, if followed but by a " single consonant,...
Page 161 - ... if I had been told that they came from the Cherokees, or the Hottentots, I should not have been surprised at their excellence. There is music which all mankind, in civilized countries, would allow to be good ; but these fragments are certainly not of that sort: for, with all the light that can be thrown upon them, they have still but a rude and inelegant appearance, and seem wholly unworthy of so ingenious, refined, and sentimental a people...
Page xxi - The only difference we make in pronunciation between vinea and venia, is, that to the vowel of the first syllable of the former, which ought to be long, we give a...
Page 162 - But, as music, there needs no other proof of the poverty of ancient melody, than its being confined to long and short syllables. We have some airs of the most graceful and pleasing kind, which will suit no arrangement of syllables to be found in poetical numbers, ancient or modern ; and which it is impossible to express by mere syllables in any language with which I am at all acquainted.
Page xxvii - I see no hope for uniformity on any other basis than this : 1. Every vowel with the accent on it at the end of a syllable is pronounced, as in English, with its first long open sound : thus, Philome'la, Orion, Pho'cion, Lu'cifer have the accented vowels sounded exactly as in the words me'tre, spider, no'ble, tutor.
Page xxviii - They are pronounced like the shorts when followed by a consonant in the same syllable. 6. Y is exactly under the same predicament as i. It is long when ending an accented syllable as Cyrus, short when joined to a consonant in the same syllable as Lyc'idas; and [sometimes] long [and sometimes short] when ending an initial syllable not under the accent.

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