Narrative of a Journey from Constantinople to England

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Frederick Westley and A. H. Davis, 1831 - Balkan Peninsula - 372 pages
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Page 43 - Conatantine, the son of Helena, and in the patriarchate of a Gregory ; it was taken, and the empire of the Greeks destroyed, under a Constantine, the son of Helena, and in the patriarchate of a Gregory ; the Turks obtained possession of it under a Mahomet, and they are firmly persuaded they will lose it under a Mahomet — and that Mahomet the present reigning Sultan...
Page 4 - Turkish luxuries ; it is always the companion of coffee, and there is something so exceedingly congenial in the properties of both, that nature seems to have intended them for inseparable associates. We do not know how to use tobacco in this country, but defile and deteriorate it with malt liquor. When used with coffee, and after the Turkish fashion, it is singularly grateful to the taste, and refreshing to the spirits; counteracting the effects of fatigue and cold, and appeasing the cravings of...
Page 183 - E considered the despotic government that had absolute power over all these resources, to direct them in whatever manner, and to whatever extent, it pleased ; and that this was but a small portion of the vast empire which extended over three parts of the globe ; — it seemed as if the Turkish power was as a sleeping lion, which had only to rouse itself and crush its opponents. But when, on the other hand, I saw the actual state of this fine country — its resources neglected, its fields lying waste...
Page 141 - However absurd these minutiae may appear to yoa, they are traits of Turkish character, which form, with other things, a striking peculiarity. It is now more than four centuries since they crossed the Hellespont, and transported themselves from Asia to Europe ; during all that time they have been in constant contact with European habits and manners, and, at times, even penetrated as far as Vienna, and so occupied the very centre of Christendom. Yet, while all the people around them have been advancing...
Page 43 - To complete this chain of names, at the time the Greek insurrection broke out, a Constantine was the heir apparent to the Russian throne, and a Gregory was the patriarch of Constantinople. They hanged at the time one of these ominous persons, and the other has since abdicated the crown. Still they are persuaded, that events will happen as they are decreed ; and the fatal combination of Mahomet, Gregory, and Constantine, will yet destroy their power in Europe.
Page 11 - ... Galata, a suburb of Pera, where a great commotion was just excited. The child of a Greek merchant had disappeared, and no one could give any account of it. It was a beautiful boy, and it was imagined it had been taken by a Turk for a slave ; after some time, however, the body was found in the Bosphorus, its legs and arms were bound, and certain wounds on its side indicated that it had been put to death in some extraordinary manner, and for some extraordinary purpose. Suspicion immediately fell...
Page 11 - I was one day at Galata, a suburb of Pera, where a great commotion was just excited. The child of a Greek merchant had disappeared, and no one could give any account of it. It was a beautiful boy, and it was imagined it had been taken by a Turk for a slave : after some time, however, the body was found in the Bosphorus ; its legs and arms were bound, and certain wounds on its side indicated that it had been put to death in some extraordinary manner, and for some extraordinary purpose. Suspicion immediately...
Page 71 - Tchorbadge, or the distributor of soup. Their kettle, therefore, is, in fact, their standard ; and whenever that is brought forward, it is the signal of some desperate enterprise. These kettles were now solemnly displayed in the Etmeidan, inverted in the middle of the area, and in a short time twenty thousand men rallied round them.
Page 12 - Much of these and similar representations are to be attributed to prejudice, and great deductions are to be made from them ; but certainly the Jews of Constantinople are a fierce and fanatic race ; persecution and suffering have not taught them moderation, and they pursue, even to death, any apostate from their own doctrines.
Page 9 - ... houses of the opulent are furnished and fitted up in a style of oriental magnificence. The lower orders, however, are marked by that peculiarity which distinguishes them in every other country ; squalor and raggedness in their persons, filth and nastiness in their houses, their morals very lax, and ready to engage in any base business which the less vile would have a repugnance to. They are distinguished, like all classes in Turkey, by a particular dress; they wear a turban like a Turkish gentleman,...

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