Poetic Diction: A Study in Meaning

Front Cover
Wesleyan University Press, 1973 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 230 pages
15 Reviews
Poetic Diction, first published in 1928, begins by asking why we call a given grouping of words “poetry” and why these arouse “aesthetic imagination” and produce pleasure in a receptive reader. Returning always to this personal experience of poetry, Owen Barfield at the same time seeks objective standards of criticism and a theory of poetic diction in broader philosophical considerations on the relation of world and thought. His profound musings explore concerns fundamental to the understanding and appreciation of poetry, including the nature of metaphor, poetic effect, the difference between verse and prose, and the essence of meaning.

CONTRIBUTOR: Howard Nemerov.
 

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Review: Poetic Diction: A Study in Meaning

User Review  - Sean Murray - Goodreads

One-trick pony. Could be a pamphlet and lose nothing Read full review

Review: Poetic Diction: A Study in Meaning

User Review  - Meirizka - Goodreads

ok Read full review

Contents

FOREWORD BY HOWARD NEMEROV page I
14
DEFINITION AND EXAMPLES
41
THE EFFECTS OF POETRY
47
METAPHOR
60
MEANING AND MYTH
77
LANGUAGE AND POETRY
93
THE POET
102
THE MAKING OF MEANING l III
111
THE MAKING OF MEANING ll
127
CONCLUSION
178
Copyright

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About the author (1973)

OWEN BARFIELD, whom C. S. Lewis called the "wisest and best of my unofficial teachers," is a philosopher and author of many books, including Saving the Appearances, Unancestral Voice, The Rediscovery of Meaning and Other Essays, Owen Barnfield on C. S. Lewis, and History, Guilt, and Habit. Born in 1898, he lives in East Sussex, England.

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