A Treatise on the Culture of the Apple & Pear: And on the Manufacture of Cider & Perry

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H. Procter, 1801 - Apples - 181 pages
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Page 91 - ... through it. When the pruner has judiciously executed his work, every part of the tree, internal as well as external, will be productive of fruit ; and the internal part, in unfavourable seasons, will rather receive protection than injury from the external. A tree thus pruned, will not only produce much more fruit, but will also be able to support a much heavier load of it, without danger of being broken ; for any given weight will depress the branch, not simply in proportion to its quantity,...
Page 49 - English horticulturist, asserts, that, "when the rind and pulp are green, the cider •will always be thin, weak and colorless ; and when these are deeply tinged with yellow, it will, however manufactured, or in whatever soil the fruit may have grown, almost always possess color and either strength or richness.
Page 92 - Each variety of the apple-tree has its own peculiar form of growth ; and this it will ultimately assume, in a considerable degree, in defiance of the art of the pruner. Something may nevertheless be done to correct whatever is defective. When the growth of any variety is weak and reclining, the principal stem should be trained to a considerable height, before it be allowed to produce branches ; and if any of these take a horizontal or pendent direction, they should be regularly taken off. One principal...
Page 91 - ... thin, and pervious to the light ; so that the internal parts of the tree may not be wholly shaded by the external parts : the light should penetrate deeply into the tree, on every side ; but not any where through it.
Page 91 - The light should penetrate deeply into the tree, on every side ; but not any where through it. When the pruner has judiciously executed his work, every part of the tree, internal as well as external, will be productive of fruit ; and the internal part, in unfavourable seasons, will rather receive protection than injury from the external. A tree, thus pruned, will not only produce much more fruit, but will also be able to support a...
Page 127 - after the fermentation has ceased, and the liquor is become clear and bright, it should instantly be drawn off, and not suffered on any account again to mingle with its lees ; for these possess much the same properties as yeast, and would inevitably bring on a second fermentation. The best criterion to judge of the proper moment to rack off will...
Page 6 - of Parkinson, for he says " it is the greatest and best of all sorts of Pippins." It was perhaps this circumstance that led Mr. Knight to remark, that from the description Parkinson has given of the apples cultivated in his time, it is evident that those now known by the same names, are different, and probably new varieties. But this is no evidence of such being the case, for I find there were two sorts of Golden Pippin, the
Page 93 - ... horizontal or pendent direction, they should be regularly taken off. One principal leading stem should be encouraged almost to the summit of the tree, to prevent a sudden division into two large boughs, of nearly equal strength; for the fork which these form is apt to divide and break when the branches are loaded with fruit. All efforts to give...
Page 38 - ... impregnated with the farina of a large claycoloured kind with purple blossoms. The produce of the seeds thus obtained were of a dark gray colour, but these having no fixed habits, were soon changed by cultivation into a numerous variety of a very large and extremely luxuriant white ones, which were not only much larger and more productive than the original white one, but the number of seeds in each pod were increased from seven to eight, to eight or nine, and not unfrequently, in one variety...
Page 74 - When the situation is high, and exposed, the trees should be closely planted, to afford each other protection ; and when the latter is poor and shallow, their growth will, of course, be less luxuriant, and they will consequently require less room: but in low and sheltered situations, and...

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