Men of Iron

Front Cover
Harper & Row, 1919 - Chivalry - 327 pages
10 Reviews
In seeking to avenge his unjustly accused father, young Myles Falworth is knighted and wins the friendship of King Henry IV.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Michael_Rose - LibraryThing

I was 12 or 13 when I read this. I don't think I could properly appreciate it at the time, culturally speaking. It offers interesting insight into life at the time, through an act of historical ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Chris_El - LibraryThing

You really need to read the unabridged edition. There is another one that was watered down to be easier to understand. Don't read that one! This would make a great movie. It reminds me of a cross between A Knights Tale (movie) and The Hedge Knight (book). Read full review

Contents

I
II
ii
III
19
IV
26
V
32
VI
42
VII
51
VIII
58
XIX
161
XX
169
XXI
179
XXII
186
XXIII
203
XXIV
219
XXV
229
XXVI
243

IX
69
X
76
XI
87
XII
98
XIII
104
XIV
114
XV
127
XVI
132
XVII
139
XVIII
149
XXVII
252
XXVIII
264
XXIX
276
XXX
286
XXXI
296
XXXII
307
XXXIII
313
XXXIV
322
Copyright

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Page 251 - As Myles took his place at the south end of the lists, he found the Sieur de la Montaigne already at his station. Through the peep-hole in the face of the huge helmet, a transverse slit known as the occularium, he could see, like a strange narrow picture, the farther end of the lists, the spectators upon either side moving and shifting with ceaseless restlessness, and in the...
Page 190 - ... yellow, and silky. His eyes were as blue as steel, and quick and sharp in glance as those of a hawk ; and as he walked, his arms swung from his broad, square shoulders, and his body swayed with pentup strength ready for action at any moment.
Page 218 - ... firmly, anchoring his story to historical happenings in his introduction, building on such a solid background of time and place that his further intrusions into the story are justifiable buttressings of fact: A quaint old book treating of knighthood and chivalry gives a full and detailed account of all the circumstances of the ceremony of a creation of a Knight of the Bath. It tells us that the candidate was first placed. . . And on he goes for several pages of exposition which is not only palatable...
Page 266 - The warfare, the blood, the evil pleasures which he had seen had been a fiery, crucible test to his soul, and I love my hero that he should have come forth from it so well. He was no longer the innocent Sir Galahad who had walked in pure white up the Long Hall to be knighted by the King, but his soul was of that grim, sterling, rugged sort that looked out calmly from his gray...
Page 252 - There was a moment of dead, tense, breathless pause, then he rather felt than saw the Marshal raise his baton. He gathered himself together, and the next moment a bugle sounded loud and clear. In one blinding rush he drove his spurs into the sides of his horse, and in instant answer felt the noble steed spring forward with a bound.

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