A Reference Grammar of Classical Tamil Poetry (150 B.C.--pre-fifth/sixth Century A.D.)

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American Philosophical Society, 1992 - Philosophy - 1089 pages
 

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Very Nice referance to Collage students

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Useful work. good job. I salute you mam. shanthy 

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Page 56 - Intransitive themes become transitive by the hardening and doubling of the consonant of the appended formative — eg, peru-gu, to abound, by this process becomes peru-kku, to increase (actively), to cause to abound. Transitives of this kind, which are formed from intransitives in actual use, are often called causals, and they are as well entitled to be called by that name as many causal verbs in the Indo-European tongues ; but as there is a class of Dravidian verbs which are...
Page 896 - Properly speaking, the Dravidian languages have no adverbs at all. Every word that is used as an adverb in the Dravidian languages is either a noun declinable or indeclinable, or a verbal theme, or the infinitive or gerund of a verb
Page 534 - The Dravidian verb is entirely destitute of a passive voice, properly so called, nor is there any reason to suppose that it ever had a passive. None of the Dravidian dialects possesses any passive particle or suffix, or any means of expressing passivity by direct inflexional changes ; the signification of the passive voice is, nevertheless, capable of being expressed in a variety of ways.
Page 534 - I have been accustomed to eat well. The Dravidian languages, indeed, are destitute of passives properly so called, and, therefore, resist every effort to bring pad-u into general use. Such efforts are constantly being made by foreigners, who are accustomed to passives in their own tongues, and fancy that they cannot get on without them ; but nothing sounds more barbarous to the Dravidian ear than the unnecessary use of padu as a passive auxiliary.
Page 534 - ... therefore, resist every effort to bring pad-u into general use. Such efforts are constantly being made by foreigners, who are accustomed to passives in their own tongues, and fancy that they cannot get on without them ; but nothing sounds more barbarous to the Dravidian ear than the unnecessary use of padu as a passive auxiliary. It is only when combined with nouns that its use is thoroughly allowable.
Page 41 - There are twelve vowels, viz. a, a, a:, i, i:, u, u:, e, e:, ai, o, o: and au...
Page 8 - Tamil, one of the two classical languages of India, is the only language of contemporary India which is recognizably continuous with a classical past.