Silence of the Spheres: The Deaf Experience in the History of Science

Front Cover
Bergin & Garvey, 1994 - Science - 187 pages

Prior to the publication of this book, there has been a complete absence of literature on the contributions of deaf men and women in science. Written by a deaf scientist, this book is one of the few syntheses of the issues facing deaf people in a particular field of professional endeavor. Because of the highly invisible nature of deafness, much of the information presented by Lang will be new to readers. His research represents six years of archival search among the historical documents of the deaf communities of Europe, Canada, and the United States. The prominent role that deaf scientists have played in history becomes apparent through Lang's presentation of the accomplishments of these talented and determined men and women. The study of deaf scientists is part of the study of other marginalized groups, and finds parallels in African American and women's studies. The issues surrounding technological development, eugenics, and disabilities in general are several of the important themes of this work.

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Contents

France and the Royal Academy of Sciences
3
Deaf Naturalists in EighteenthCentury England
16
The Deaf Physician and the Barrier of Attitudes
30
Breakthroughs in European Higher Education
52
Emerging Professions
71
Attitudes and Activism at the Turn of the Century
81
An Unfulfilled Need
94
The Second World
115
Technological Change and the Issue of Access
128
Epilogue
147
Bibliography
165
Inder
179
Copyright

About the author (1994)

HARRY G. LANG is Professor of Educational Research and Development at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology. He has written more than 35 articles and essays on science education and Deaf studies.

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