Scotland in Europe

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Tom Hubbard, Ronald D. S. Jack
Rodopi, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 304 pages
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If there is ocht in Scotland that's worth ha'en / There is nae distance to which it's unattached – Hugh MacDiarmidA realignment of Scottish literary studies is long overdue. The present volume counters the relative neglect of comparative literature in Scotland by exploring the fortunes of Scottish writing in mainland Europe, and, conversely, the engagement of Scottish literary intellectuals with European texts. Most of the contributions draw on the onlineBibliography of Scottish Literature in Translation. Together they demonstrate the richness of the creative dialogue, not only between writers, but also between musicians and visual artists when they turn their attention to literature.The contributors to this volume cover most of Europe, including the German-speaking countries, Scandinavia, France, Catalonia, Portugal, Italy, the Balkans, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Russia. All Scotland's major literary languages – Gaelic, Scots, English and Latin – are featured in a continent-wide labyrinth that will repay further exploration.
 

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Contents

Contributors
7
Zsuzsanna Varga
8
Roger Green
25
S Jack
39
Norbert Waszek
55
Christopher Whyte
73
J Derrick McClure
89
Margaret Elphinstone
105
Corinna Krause
153
Dominique Delmaire
169
Eilidh Bateman and Sergi Mainer
185
ScottishPortuguese Literary Contacts Since 1500
203
Marco Fazzini
221
Emilia Szaffner
247
Teresa Grace Murray
265
Robert R Calder
281

Kirsteen McCue
119
Iain Galbraith
137

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About the author (2006)

Tom Hubbard was recently Visiting Professor in Scottish Literature and Culture at the Universities of Budapest and Pecs, and is an Honorary Fellow of the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh.
R.D.S. Jack is Emeritus Professor of Medieval and Scottish Literature and Honorary Fellow, University of Edinburgh.

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