Dwelling, Seeing, and Designing: Toward a Phenomenological Ecology

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David Seamon
SUNY Press, 1993 - Architecture - 363 pages
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Contributors include architects, philosophers, landscape architects, and geographers, who focus on the question of how people might see and understand the natural and built environments in a deeper, more perceptive way. What is a sense of place and how can it be supported by architecture, policy, and education? Why are places important to people, and can designers and policy-makers create better places? Is there a way to see and understand what might help to make buildings, landscapes, and places that are beautiful, alive, and humane? What role do the geographical and architectural environments play in human life?
 

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Contents

Modernity and the Reclamation of Place
25
Thoughts on a NonArbitrary Architecture
41
Interpreting a Spatial Pattern
77
The Legacy
129
Toward a Phenomenology of Landscape
159
Toward
247
Promoting a Foundational Ecology Practically
331
Contributors
357
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About the author (1993)

David Seamon is Associate Professor of Architecture at Kansas State University. He is the author of A Geography of the Lifeworld, and Dwelling, Place, and Environment: Towards a Phenomenology of Person and World.

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