A dictionary of the English language

Front Cover
Alex. Thom, printer and publisher, 1847 - English language - 384 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxxvi - Monosyllables, and words accented on the last syllable, ending with a single consonant preceded by a single vowel, double that consonant, when they take another syllable beginning with a vowel : as, wit, witty ; thin, thinnish ; to abet, an abettor ; to begin, a beginner.
Page xxxvi - In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold; Alike fantastic, if too new, or old: Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
Page xiv - Most of the writers of English grammar have given long tables of words pronounced otherwise than they are written; and seem not sufficiently to have considered, that, of English, as of all living tongues, there is a double pronunciation; one cursory and colloquial; the other, regular and solemn.
Page xxxv - Of these reformers some have endeavoured to accommodate orthography better to the pronunciation, without considering that this is to measure by a shadow, to take that for a model or standard which is changing while they apply it.
Page xiv - ... when I published the Plan for my Dictionary, Lord Chesterfield told me that the word great should be pronounced so as to rhyme to state ; and Sir William Yonge sent me word that it should be pronounced so as to rhyme to seat, and that none but an Irishman would pronounce it grait. Now here were two men of the highest rank, the one, the best speaker in the House of Lords, the other, the best speaker in the House of Commons, differing entirely.
Page 64 - Di"git, a, three quarters of an inch ; the twelfth part of the diameter of the sun or moon ; any number under ten.
Page 353 - CHIMERA ; a fabulous monster, breathing flames, with the head of a lion, the body of a goat, and the tail of a dragon, which laid waste the fields of Lycia, and was at last destroyed by Bcllerophon.
Page 349 - Artemis in the grotto when she and her nymphs were cooling themselves with water and bathing, was changed by her into a stag, and torn to pieces by his own hounds. 1 Anabasis, v., 3, 6-13. " Chaste and holy " calls Homer the form of Artemis, and just as she herself was so had her priestesses to be.
Page xiv - The solemn pronunciation, though by no means immutable and permanent, is yet always less remote from the orthography, and less liable to capricious innovation. They have, however, generally formed their tables according to the cursory speech of those with whom they happened to converse ; and, concluding that the whole nation combines to vitiate language in one manner, have often established the jargon of the lowest of the people as the model of speech. For pronunciation the best general rule is,...
Page xiv - English, as of all living tongues, there is a double pronunciation, one cursory and colloquial, the other regular and solemn. The cursory pronunciation is always vague and uncertain, being made different in different mouths by negligence, unskilfulness, or affectation.

Bibliographic information