A glossary of provincial words used in Herefordshire and some of the adjoining counties

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Page 47 - Because I have called, and ye refused, I have stretched out my hand, and no man regarded; but ye have set at nought all my counsel, and would none of my reproof: I also will laugh at your calamity; I will mock when your fear cometh.
Page 56 - ... bonnet is entitled to the last bit. Whoever draws the black bit, is the devoted person who is to be sacrificed to Baal, whose favour they mean to implore in rendering the year productive of the sustenance of man and beast. There is little doubt of these inhuman sacrifices having been once offered in this country as well as in the East, although they now omit the act of sacrificing, and only compel the devoted person to leap three times through the flames, with which the ceremonies of this festival...
Page 56 - They kindle a fire, and dress a repast of eggs and milk in the consistence of a custard. They knead a cake of oatmeal, which is toasted at the embers against a stone. After the custard is eaten up, they divide the cake into so many portions, as similar as possible to one another in size and shape, as there are persons in the company. They daub one of these portions all over with charcoal until it be perfectly black. They put all the bits of the cake into a bonnet.
Page 56 - They then kindle a fire, and dress a repast of eggs and milk in the consistence of a custard. They knead a cake of oatmeal, which is toasted at the embers against a stone. After the custard is eaten up, they divide the cake...
Page 56 - Beltan or 2&/-&2#-day, all the boys in a township or hamlet meet in the moors. They cut a table in the green sod, of a round figure, by casting a trench in the ground of such circumference as to hold the whole company. They kindle a fire, and dress a repast of eggs and milk in the consistence of a custard. They knead a cake of oatmeal, which is toasted at the embers against a stone. After the custard is eaten up, they divide the...
Page 125 - French estovers : and therefore house-bote is a sufficient allowance of wood, to repair, or to burn in, the house : which latter is sometimes called fire-bote : plough-bote and cart-bote are wood to be employed in making and repairing all instruments of husbandry ; and hay-bote, or hedge-bote, is wood for repairing of hay, hedges, or fences.
Page 61 - ... he be first in the race. For the laws of the Olympic games were never more strictly adhered to, than the bridal race by the Craven peasants.— Even the fair were not excluded in the horse race from this glorious contest Whoever had the good fortune to arrive first at the bride's house, requested to be shewn to the chamber of the new married pair.
Page 47 - I thoughte o' that meat, which endureth unto ever" lasting life. Oh, then, my dear barns, tak warnih " by me, lest ye also come into this place of torment.
Page 124 - Common of estovers or estouviers, that is, necessaries (from estoffer, to furnish), is a liberty of taking necessary wood, for the use or furniture of a house or farm, from off another's estate.
Page 138 - Pent up by their native mountains, and principally engaged in agricultural pursuits, the inhabitants of this district had no opportunity of corrupting the purity of their language by the adoption of foreign idioms. But it has become a subject of much regret that, since the introduction of commerce, and, in consequence of that, a greater intercourse, the simplicity of the language has, of late years, been much corrupted.

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