Human

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 13, 2009 - Science - 464 pages
24 Reviews

What happened along the evolutionary trail that made humans so unique? In his accessible style, Michael Gazzaniga pinpoints the change that made us thinking, sentient humans different from our predecessors. He explores what makes human brains special, the importance of language and art in defining the human condition, the nature of human consciousness, and even artificial intelligence.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
5
3 stars
10
2 stars
2
1 star
1

Review: Human: The Science Behind What Makes Us Unique

User Review  - Dave Peticolas - Goodreads

Focusing on what makes human beings unique, Gazzaniga reviews the latest research across many scientific disciplines. It's all good, and written in an enjoyably informal style, but he's at his best in ... Read full review

Review: Human: The Science Behind What Makes Us Unique

User Review  - William Schram - Goodreads

This book is quite good. It describes recent (circa 2008) developments in neurology, neuroscience, anthropology and other fields of interest to describe the differences between people and animals. It ... Read full review

Contents

Are Human Brains Unique?
7
Would a Chimp Make a Good Date?
38
Part 2
77
The Moral Compass Within
113
Whats Up with the Arts?
203
The Converter
246
Is Anybody There?
276
Part 4
323
Afterword
386
Index
432
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Michael S. Gazzaniga is the director of the SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the president of the Cognitive Neuroscience Institute, a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Sciences. In addition, he is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and newly elected to serve on its Board of Directors. He is also past president of the Association of Psychological Science and served on the President's Bioethics Council from 2002-2008. The author of many popular science books, including Who's In Charge? (Ecco, 2011), Human (Ecco, 2008), Nature's Mind (Basic, 1992), and Mind Matters (Houghton Mifflin, 1988), he is featured regularly on Public Television and National Public Radio, and his research has been presented on NBC Nightly News and The Today Show. Gazzaniga lives in California with his wife. He has six children.

Bibliographic information