The Caucasus and its people: with a brief history of their wars, and a sketch of the achievements of the renowned chief Schamyl

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D. Nutt, 1856 - Caucasus - 204 pages
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Page 201 - Ararat bears evidence of having been subjected to violent volcanic action, being seamed and scored with deep ravines. The rocky ridges that protrude from the snow are either basalt or tufa ; and near the summit we found some bits of pumice on a spot which still emits a strong sulphurous smell. The summit itself is nearly level, of a triangular shape, the base being about 200 yards in length, the perpendicular about 300. The highest point is at the apex of the triangle, which points nearly due west...
Page 194 - Darley Abbey, Derbyshire, and myself, started from Bayazid on this new expedition. We were accompanied by two servants and a zaptieh, or native policeman, and by the kindness of the Kai'makam, Hadjee Mustapha Effendi, we were consigned to the special charge of Issak Bey, a chief of the Ararat Kurds, under whose safeguard we had nothing to fear from the plundering habits of his followers. At Bayazid we had provided ourselves each with a stout pole between five and six feet long, furnished with a spike...
Page 198 - ... having been thrown back full three hours by his mishap. He descended on the traces of Messrs. Theobold and Evans, and regained the tents at midnight, having been about twenty hours on foot. On the 13th, about 2 pm, Mr. Thursby and I started from the tents accompanied by two Kurds, carrying rugs, greatcoats, and a small supply of provisions. We proceeded slowly and leisurely until we reached about one-third the ascent of the cone. There we were obliged to dismiss the Kurds, who, from religious...
Page 194 - For three hours we wound our way through rugged defiles, occasionally traversing fertile plateaus, verdant with growing crops of wheat and barley. Our sure-footed little horses, accustomed to this sort of work, picked their way through the most breakneck places, and brought us in safety to the black goats'-hair tents of our host, which were pitched on some pasture lands on the southern slope of Greater Ararat, about 8,000 feet above the level of the sea. Hither the Kurds resort in summer with their...
Page 201 - We descended on the tracks of the others, and got back to the tents about 4 PM The whole surface of Mount Ararat bears evidence of having been subjected to violent volcanic action, being seamed and scored with deep ravines. The rocky ridges that protrude from the snow are either basalt or tufa ; and near the summit we found some bits of pumice, on a spot which still emits a strong sulphureous smell.
Page 196 - ... limbs. For a time we kept pretty well together ; by degrees, however, Mr. Theobold began to forge a-head, followed by Mr. Evans, while I brought up the rear as well as I could. But my strength was fast giving way, and when about half way up the cone I found myself utterly unable to proceed any further. Accordingly, there being no alternative but to descend, I sat on the snow and shot down with the velocity of an arrow, undoing in a few minutes the laborious toil of nearly three hours. This was...
Page 196 - ... too, must soon give in ; but no, up they went higher and higher, his interest and surprise keeping pace with their ascent. For some hours we watched their upward course, the sharp naked eye of the Kurd plainly discerning what I was able to see only with the aid of a telescope. At length, at 1,45, Mr. Theobold crowned the summit. Great was the astonishment of the chief. "Mashallah!
Page 31 - In Circassia weddings are accompanied by a feast, ' in the midst of which the bridegroom has to rush in, ' and, with the help of a few daring young men, carry ' off the lady by force ; and by this process she becomes
Page 178 - ... destroyed. For I tell you, that a thousand poisonous fungi spring out of the earth before a single good tree reaches maturity. I am the root of the tree of liberty, my Murids are the trunk, and you are the branches. But do you believe that the rottenness of one branch must entail the destruction of the entire tree ? God will lop off the rotten branches, and cast them into the eternal fire. Return, therefore, penitently, and enrol yourselves among the number of those who fight for our faith...

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