The Lost Keys of Freemasonry

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Courier Corporation, Mar 7, 2012 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 144 pages
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A high-ranking Mason offers a fascinating glimpse into the Western world's most secretive society. Manly P. Hall, a scholar of occult and esoteric ideas, traces the path followed by initiates to the ancient craft. Hall also recounts the ethical training required of a Freemason, and he profiles the character traits a Mason must "build" within himself.
More than a mere social organization a few centuries old, Freemasonry can be regarded as a perpetuation of the philosophical mysteries and initiations of the ancients. This book reveals the unique and distinctive elements that have inspired generations of Masons. Thoughtful members of the craft, as well as outsiders, will appreciate its exploration of Masonic idealism and the eternal quest, from humble candidate to entered apprentice and master Mason.
 

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About the author (2012)

Manly Palmer Hall (March 18, 1901 - August 29, 1990) was a Canadian-born author and mystic. He is perhaps most famous for his work The Secret Teachings of All Ages: An Encyclopedic Outline of Masonic, Hermetic, Qabbalistic and Rosicrucian Symbolical Philosophy, published in 1928 when he was 27 years old. It is claimed that Hall was made a knight patron of the Masonic Research Group of San Francisco in 1953, although he was not raised as a Mason until 22 November 1954 into Jewel Lodge No. 374, San Francisco. He later received his 32 in the Valley of San Francisco AASR (SJ). In 1973 (47 years after writing The Secret Teachings of All Ages), Hall was recognized as a 33 Mason (the highest honor conferred by the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite), at a ceremony held at the Philosophical Research Society (PRS) on December 8,1973.). The definitive Manly Palmer Hall Archive states that Hall received the 33, "despite never being initiated into the physical craft." In his over 70-year career, Hall delivered approximately 8,000 lectures in the United States and abroad, authored over 150 books and essays, and wrote countless magazine articles.

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