Zones of Peace

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Landon E. Hancock, Christopher Roger Mitchell
Kumarian Press, 2007 - Political Science - 238 pages
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* Looks at the ways people have used sanctuary throughout history and in present-day conflicts to avoid or challenge violence
* Authors with practical experience in peace zones throughout Asia, Europe, Africa and Latin America

The notion of having sanctuary from violence or threat has probably existed as long as conflict itself. Whether people seek safety in a designated location, such as a church or hospital or over a regional border, or whether their professions or life situations (doctors, children) allow them, at least in theory, to avoid injury in war, sanctuary has served as a powerful symbol of non-violence.

The authors of this collection examine sanctuary as it relates to historical and modern conflicts from the Philippines to Colombia and Sudan. They chart the formation and evolution of these varied "zones of peace" and attempt to arrive at a "theory of sanctuary" that might allow for new and useful peacebuilding strategies.

This book makes a significant contribution to the field of conflict resolution, using case studies to highlight efforts made by local people to achieve safety and democracy amid and following violent civil wars. The authors ground the emerging interest in sanctuary by providing a much needed description of the complexity of these peace zones.

Other Contributors: Kevin Avruch, Pushpa Iyer, Roberto Jose, Jennifer Langdon, Nancy Morrison, Krista Rigalo, Catalina Rojas and Mery Rodriguez.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
29
III
51
IV
71
V
91
VI
105
VII
123
VIII
137
IX
167
X
189
XI
223
XII
227
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