Enoch and Qumran Origins: New Light on a Forgotten Connection

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Jun 3, 2005 - Religion - 454 pages
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The rediscovery of Enochic Judaism as an ancient movement of dissent within Second Temple Judaism, a movement centered on neither temple nor torah, is a major achievement of contemporary research. After being marginalized, ancient Enoch texts have reemerged as a significant component of the Dead Sea Scrolls library unearthed at Qumran.

Enoch and Qumran Origins is the first comprehensive treatment of the complex and forgotten relations between the Qumran community and the Jewish group behind the pseudepigraphal literature of Enoch. The contributors demonstrate that the roots of the Qumran community are to be found in the tradition of the Enoch group rather than that of the Jerusalem priesthood.

Framed by Gabriele Boccaccini's introduction and James Charlesworth's conclusion, this book examines the hypotheses of five particularly eminent scholars, resulting in an engaging and substantive discussion among forty-seven specialists from nine countries. The exceptional array of essays from leading international scholars in Second Temple Judaism and Christian origins makes Enoch and Qumran Origins a sine qua non for serious students of this period.

Contributors: William Adler
Matthias Albani
Jeff S. Anderson
Albert I. Baumgarten
Andreas Bedenbender
Stefan Beyerle
Gabriele Boccaccini
James H. Charlesworth
John J. Collins
Michael A. Daise
James R. Davila
Torleif Elgvin
Mark A. Elliott
Hanan Eshel
Peter W. Flint
Ida Fröhlich
Florentino Garca Martnez
Claudio Gianotto
Lester L. Grabbe
Ithamar Gruenwald
Charlotte Hempel
Matthias Henze
Martha Himmelfarb
Michael A. Knibb
Klaus Koch
Helge S. Kvanvig
Armin Lange
Erik W. Larson
Timothy H. Lim
Corrado Martone
George W. E. Nickelsburg
Pierluigi Piovanelli
Émile Puech
Annette Yoshiko Reed
John C. Reeves
Henry W. Morisada Rietz
Paolo Sacchi
Lawrence H. Schiffman
Loren T. Stuckenbruck
David W. Suter
Shemaryahu Talmon
Eibert J. C. Tigchelaar
Patrick Tiller
Liliana Rosso Ubigli
James C. VanderKam
Jacques van Ruiten
Benjamin G. Wright III
 

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A volume in a continuing series centering on the Enoch literature and 2nd Temple Judaism. The volume discusses theories about the relationship between the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Enoch literature. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Greek Fragments of Enoch from Qumran Cave 7
222
Context Text and Social Setting of the Apocalypse of Weeks
232
References to Part Three
240
THE GRONINGEN HYPOTHESIS REVISITED
245
Strengths and Weaknesses
247
Reflections on the Groningen Hypothesis
254
Sealing Some Cracks in the Groningen Foundation
261
The Yahad Is More Than Qumran
271

The Apocalyptic Worldview of Daniel
57
References to Part One
65
ENOCH AND JUBILEES
71
Jubilees Read as a Narrative
73
Influence and Interpretation in Early Jewish Literature
82
A Literary Dependency of Jubilees on 1 Enoch?
88
Jubilees 1 Enoch Qumran and the Prehistory of the Biblical Canon
92
Jubilees and 1 Enoch and the Issue of Transmission of Knowledge
97
4Q390 the 490Year Prophecy and the Calendrical History of the Second Temple Period
100
Jubilees as a Tradition for the Qumran Community
109
The Festival of Dedication and the Delay of Feasts in 1QS 11315
117
Jubilees and Sectarianism
127
Denouncement Speech in Jubilees and Other Enochic Literature
130
The HistoricalCultural Background of the Book of Jubilees
135
Enoch and Jubilees
139
Apocalypticism and the Religion and Ritual of the PreSinaitic Narratives
146
3 Enoch and the Enoch Tradition
150
Jubilees and Enoch
160
References to Part Two
169
THE APOCALYPSE OF WEEKS
181
History as a Battlefield of Two Antagonistic Powers in the Apocalypse of Weeks and in the Rule of the Community
183
Reflection on Ideology and Date of the Apocalypse of Weeks
198
The Enochic Circles the Hasidim and the Qumran Community
202
The Apocalypse of Weeks and the Architecture of the End Time
205
The Plant Metaphor in Its InnerEnochic and Early Jewish Context
208
The Apocalypse of Weeks and the Epistle of Enoch
211
Evaluating the Discussions concerning the Original Order of Chapters 9193 and Codicological Data Pertaining to 4Q212 and Chester Beatty XII Enoch
218
Digging among the Roots of the Groningen Hypothesis
278
One Methodological Assumption of the Groningen Hypothesis of Qumran Origins
284
The Translation of NDMW and Its Signif1cance for the Groningen Hypothesis
289
Comments concerning the QumranEssenes Hypothesis
292
The Essenes and Qumran the Teacher and the Wicked Priest the origins
296
The Headquarters of the Essenes or a Marginal Splinter Group?
301
The Groningen Hypothesis Revisited
308
References to Part Four
315
THE ENOCHICESSENE HYPOTHESIS REVISITED
325
Theodicy and the Problem of the Intimate Enemy
327
1 Enoch as Evidence for Intellectual History Social Realities and Literary Tradition
334
Groups and Movements in Judaism in the Early Second Century BCE
343
Problems and Pitfalls
349
Enochians Essenes and Qumran Essenes
354
Some Observations on the Qumran Zadokite Priesthood
358
Some Archaeological Sociological and CrossCultural Afterthoughts on the Groningen and the EnochicEssene Hypotheses
364
Complicating the Notion of an Enochic Judaism
371
Enoch Moses and the Essenes
382
Too Far Beyond the Essene Hypothesis?
386
Some Remarks on the Partings of the Ways
392
History of the Earliest Enochic Texts
399
Different Bibles for Different Groups?
406
Essenes Qumran and Christian Origins
412
Texts Intellectual Movements and Social Groups
415
References to Part Five
424
The Books of Enoch or 1 Enoch Matters New Paradigms for Understanding Pre70 Judaism
434
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Page 42 - subject to the divine curse. The angel responds to Daniel's doubts and reveals that the seventy years of Jeremiah's prophecy should in reality be understood as “seventy weeks of years,” and that this span of time corresponds to the time necessary “to finish the transgression, to put an end to sin, and to atone for iniquity
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Page 43 - seventy weeks of years” (Dan 9:24). God's punishment will culminate in the coming, in the last week, of a king who “shall make a strong covenant with many for one week, and for half of the week
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References to this book

About the author (2005)

Gabriele Boccaccini is professor of Second Temple Judaism and Christian origins at the University of Michigan and director of the Enoch Seminar, a biennial international conference on the Enoch literature.

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